The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites

Ushashi C. Dadwal, Kevin A. Maupin, Ariane Zamarioli, Aamir Tucker, Jonathan S. Harris, James P. Fischer, Jeffery D. Rytlewski, David C. Scofield, Austin E. Wininger, Fazal Ur Rehman Bhatti, Marta Alvarez, Paul J. Childress, Nabarun Chakraborty, Aarti Gautam, Rasha Hammamieh, Melissa Kacena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Spaceflight results in reduced mechanical loading of the skeleton, which leads to dramatic bone loss. Low bone mass is associated with increased fracture risk, and this combination may compromise future, long-term, spaceflight missions. Here, we examined the systemic effects of spaceflight and fracture surgery/healing on several non-injured bones within the axial and appendicular skeleton. Forty C57BL/6, male mice were randomized into the following groups: (1) Sham surgery mice housed on the earth (Ground + Sham); (2) Femoral segmental bone defect surgery mice housed on the earth (Ground + Surgery); (3) Sham surgery mice housed in spaceflight (Flight + Sham); and (4) Femoral segmental bone defect surgery mice housed in spaceflight (Flight + Surgery). Mice were 9 weeks old at the time of launch and were euthanized approximately 4 weeks after launch. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate standard bone parameters in the tibia, humerus, sternebra, vertebrae, ribs, calvarium, mandible, and incisor. One intriguing finding was that both spaceflight and surgery resulted in virtually identical losses in tibial trabecular bone volume fraction, BV/TV (24–28% reduction). Another important finding was that surgery markedly changed tibial cortical bone geometry. Understanding how spaceflight, surgery, and their combination impact non-injured bones will improve treatment strategies for astronauts and terrestrial humans alike.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11419
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Space Flight
Fracture Healing
Bone and Bones
Thigh
Skeleton
Astronauts
Humerus
Ribs
Incisor
Tibia
Mandible
Skull
Spine
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Dadwal, U. C., Maupin, K. A., Zamarioli, A., Tucker, A., Harris, J. S., Fischer, J. P., ... Kacena, M. (2019). The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites. Scientific reports, 9(1), [11419]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47695-3

The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites. / Dadwal, Ushashi C.; Maupin, Kevin A.; Zamarioli, Ariane; Tucker, Aamir; Harris, Jonathan S.; Fischer, James P.; Rytlewski, Jeffery D.; Scofield, David C.; Wininger, Austin E.; Bhatti, Fazal Ur Rehman; Alvarez, Marta; Childress, Paul J.; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Gautam, Aarti; Hammamieh, Rasha; Kacena, Melissa.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 11419, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dadwal, UC, Maupin, KA, Zamarioli, A, Tucker, A, Harris, JS, Fischer, JP, Rytlewski, JD, Scofield, DC, Wininger, AE, Bhatti, FUR, Alvarez, M, Childress, PJ, Chakraborty, N, Gautam, A, Hammamieh, R & Kacena, M 2019, 'The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites', Scientific reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 11419. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47695-3
Dadwal UC, Maupin KA, Zamarioli A, Tucker A, Harris JS, Fischer JP et al. The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites. Scientific reports. 2019 Dec 1;9(1). 11419. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-47695-3
Dadwal, Ushashi C. ; Maupin, Kevin A. ; Zamarioli, Ariane ; Tucker, Aamir ; Harris, Jonathan S. ; Fischer, James P. ; Rytlewski, Jeffery D. ; Scofield, David C. ; Wininger, Austin E. ; Bhatti, Fazal Ur Rehman ; Alvarez, Marta ; Childress, Paul J. ; Chakraborty, Nabarun ; Gautam, Aarti ; Hammamieh, Rasha ; Kacena, Melissa. / The effects of spaceflight and fracture healing on distant skeletal sites. In: Scientific reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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