The emotional impact of sexual violence research on participants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Participation in research on sexual trauma may provoke disturbing memories and distressing emotions. Despite the proliferation of research on sexual violence during the last decade, little is known about the effects of study involvement on participants. Based on a review of the literature, the author's experiences as a sexual violence researcher, and reflections of women who have participated in such research, this article explores the emotional impact of sexual violence research on participants. Although the risk of lasting harm stemming from participation in trauma research is a legitimate concern, the benefits of confiding a traumatic experience to a trustworthy other seem to outweigh the immediate distress that accompanies discussion of painful experiences. A useful framework for understanding the responses of research participants who talk or write about traumatic experiences is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-169
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Sex Offenses
Research
Wounds and Injuries
Emotions
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

The emotional impact of sexual violence research on participants. / Draucker, Claire.

In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 13, No. 4, 1999, p. 161-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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