The evaluation of ear canal, middle ear, temporal bone, and cerebellopontine angle masses in infants, children, and adolescents.

P. S. Bellet, C. Benton, Bruce Matt, C. M. Myer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ear canal, middle ear, temporal bone, and CPA angle masses (except for cholesteatomas) are rare in the pediatric population. The physician needs to have a high degree of suspicion for such lesions if a child presents with ear pain unrelated to infection or otorrhea that fails to improve after treatment. A precise diagnosis needs to be made in these children and also in those with hearing loss, vertigo, and facial paralysis. The most useful imaging procedures for ear, temporal bone, and CPA masses are CT and MR imaging. With a suspected vascular lesion, a definitive diagnosis usually can be made by an imaging procedure or angiography. In all cases of mass lesions, except for some aneurysms and infections, a tissue diagnosis must be secured.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-205
Number of pages39
JournalAdvances in Pediatrics
Volume39
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebellopontine Angle
Ear Canal
Temporal Bone
Middle Ear
Ear
Cholesteatoma
Facial Paralysis
Vertigo
Infection
Hearing Loss
Aneurysm
Blood Vessels
Angiography
Pediatrics
Physicians
Pain
Population
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The evaluation of ear canal, middle ear, temporal bone, and cerebellopontine angle masses in infants, children, and adolescents. / Bellet, P. S.; Benton, C.; Matt, Bruce; Myer, C. M.

In: Advances in Pediatrics, Vol. 39, 1992, p. 167-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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