The fiberoptic intraparenchymal cerebral pressure monitor in 244 patients

Scott Shapiro, Robin Bowman, James Callahan, Christopher Wolfla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fiberoptic intraparenchymal pressure monitor has been shown to provide reliable data in patients monitored for a short period of time. An analysis of a large population, including patients monitored for a prolonged period such as weeks, has never been performed. METHODS We conducted a retrospective study in which we evaluated the fiberoptic intraparenchymal cerebral pressure monitor for complications and accuracy. RESULTS The fiberoptic intraparenchymal cerebral pressure (ICP) monitor was used in 244 patients since 1988. Pathology included trauma in 180, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in 19, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 16, arteriovenous malformations in 10, cerebral edema in 12, and tumor in 7. The mean length of monitoring was 7 days with 49 patients (20%) monitored 1-2 days, 105 (43%) monitored 3-6 days, 48 monitored for 7-10 days (20%), and 42 (17%) monitored from 10-24 days. Seventy-four patients also had ventriculostomies and there was strong correlation with the ICP monitor (p < 0.001). Complications from insertion were 2 patients (0.8%) with ICH, both with hepatic dysfunction. In the group monitored greater than 6 days, 34 patients (38%) required at least one catheter change due to upward drift of the ICP. Fiberoptic breakage requiring replacement was documented in 41 patients (16%). An insertion-site infection occurred in one case monitored for 23 days. Two infected bone flaps occurred that had a monitor placed in the flap. There were no cases of bacterial meningitis or cerebral abscess. CONCLUSIONS The monitor is easy, safe, and reliable to use with a very low rate of infection. Coagulopathic patients may best be monitored by an alternative method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)278-281
Number of pages4
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1996

Fingerprint

Pressure
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Ventriculostomy
Brain Abscess
Bacterial Meningitides
Arteriovenous Malformations
Brain Edema
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Infection
Catheters
Retrospective Studies
Pathology
Bone and Bones
Liver
Wounds and Injuries
Population
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Fiberoptic
  • ICP
  • ICP monitor
  • Intracranial pressure monitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The fiberoptic intraparenchymal cerebral pressure monitor in 244 patients. / Shapiro, Scott; Bowman, Robin; Callahan, James; Wolfla, Christopher.

In: Surgical Neurology, Vol. 45, No. 3, 03.1996, p. 278-281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shapiro, Scott ; Bowman, Robin ; Callahan, James ; Wolfla, Christopher. / The fiberoptic intraparenchymal cerebral pressure monitor in 244 patients. In: Surgical Neurology. 1996 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 278-281.
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