The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study

Chris Fox, Gill Livingston, Ian D. Maidment, Simon Coulton, David G. Smithard, Malaz Boustani, Cornelius Katona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effect of medications with anticholinergic effects on cognitive impairment and deterioration in Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Methods: cognitive function was measured at baseline and at 6- and 18-month follow-up using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Battery, Cognitive subsection (ADAS-COG) in a cohort study of 224 participants with AD. Baseline anticholinergic Burden score (ABS) was measured using the Anticholinergic Burden scale and included all prescribed and over the counter medication. Results: the sample was 224 patients with Alzheimer's dementia and 71.4% were women. Their mean age was 81.0 years [SD 7.4 (range 55-98)]. The mean number of medications taken was 3.6 (SD 2.4) and the mean anticholinergic load was 1.1 (SD 1.4, range 0-7). The total number of drugs taken and anticholinergic load correlated (rho = 0.44; P < 0.01). There were no differences in MMSE and other cognitive functioning at either 6 or 18 months after adjusting for baseline cognitive function, age, gender and use of cholinesterase inhibitors between those with, and those without high anticholinergenic load. Conclusions: medications with anticholinergic effect in patients with AD were not found to effect deterioration in cognition over the subsequent 18 months. Our study did not support a continuing effect of these medications on people with AD who are established on them.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberafr102
Pages (from-to)730-735
Number of pages6
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Cholinergic Antagonists
Alzheimer Disease
Lasers
Cognition
Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Cohort Studies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Dementia and anticholinergic burden
  • Elderly

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Fox, C., Livingston, G., Maidment, I. D., Coulton, S., Smithard, D. G., Boustani, M., & Katona, C. (2011). The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study. Age and Ageing, 40(6), 730-735. [afr102]. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr102

The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study. / Fox, Chris; Livingston, Gill; Maidment, Ian D.; Coulton, Simon; Smithard, David G.; Boustani, Malaz; Katona, Cornelius.

In: Age and Ageing, Vol. 40, No. 6, afr102, 11.2011, p. 730-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fox, C, Livingston, G, Maidment, ID, Coulton, S, Smithard, DG, Boustani, M & Katona, C 2011, 'The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study', Age and Ageing, vol. 40, no. 6, afr102, pp. 730-735. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr102
Fox C, Livingston G, Maidment ID, Coulton S, Smithard DG, Boustani M et al. The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study. Age and Ageing. 2011 Nov;40(6):730-735. afr102. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afr102
Fox, Chris ; Livingston, Gill ; Maidment, Ian D. ; Coulton, Simon ; Smithard, David G. ; Boustani, Malaz ; Katona, Cornelius. / The impact of anticholinergic burden in Alzheimer's dementia-the laser-AD study. In: Age and Ageing. 2011 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 730-735.
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