The impact of brief messages on HSV-2 screening uptake among female defendants in a court setting

A randomized controlled trial utilizing prospect theory

Alexis M. Roth, Barbara Van Der Pol, J. Fortenberry, Brian Dodge, Michael Reece, David Certo, Gregory Zimet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epidemiologic data demonstrate that women involved with the criminal justice system in the United States are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections, including herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Female defendants were recruited from a misdemeanor court to assess whether brief framed messages utilizing prospect theory could encourage testing for HSV-2. Participants were randomly assigned to a message condition (gain, loss, or control), completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing factors associated with antibody test uptake/refusal and were offered free point-of-care HSV-2 serologic testing. Although individuals in the loss-frame group accepted testing at the highest rate, an overall statistical difference in HSV-2 testing behavior by group (p ≤.43) was not detected. The majority of the sample (74.6%) characterized receiving a serological test for HSV-2 as health affirming. However, this did not moderate the effect of the intervention nor was it significantly associated with test acceptance (p ≤.82). Although the effects of message framing are subtle, the findings have important theoretical implications given the participants' characterization of HSV-2 screening as health affirming despite being a detection behavior. Implications of study results for health care providers interested in brief, low cost interventions are also explored.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 2
Viruses
Screening
Randomized Controlled Trials
misdemeanor
Testing
health
Group
acceptance
justice
Point-of-Care Systems
Health
health care
Acceptance tests
Criminal Law
Serologic Tests
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
costs
interview
Health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication

Cite this

The impact of brief messages on HSV-2 screening uptake among female defendants in a court setting : A randomized controlled trial utilizing prospect theory. / Roth, Alexis M.; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Fortenberry, J.; Dodge, Brian; Reece, Michael; Certo, David; Zimet, Gregory.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 230-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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