The impact of household smoking on child tobacco use, attitudes and knowledge

Terrell W. Zollinger, Robert M. Saywell, Carolyn M. Muegge, Lora J. Bogda, J. Scott Wooldridge, Sandra F. Cummings

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Purpose: This study examines the impact of living in a home with smokers on children's attitudes, knowledge and use of tobacco. Methods: 8,158 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students were surveyed. Results: Most resided in homes with at least one smoker. Children residing with smokers were three times as likely to be currently smoking; four times as likely to be frequently smoking; two times as likely to have friends who smoke; four times as likely to say they started smoking because 'family members smoked'; and 3.8 times as likely to worry about the effects of smoking on their family and friends. Non-smoking children from smoking households were 2.7 times as likely to say they will probably start smoking within one year. Conclusion: Living in a home with others who smoke has a significant adverse impact on a child's smoking. Parents and siblings giving anti-smoking messages would improve the effectiveness of tobacco control programmes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)45-50
    Number of pages6
    JournalInternational Journal of Health Promotion and Education
    Volume43
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

    Fingerprint

    Tobacco Use
    Smoking
    Smoke
    Tobacco
    Siblings
    Parents
    Students

    Keywords

    • Attitudes
    • Children
    • Environment
    • Smoking

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Zollinger, T. W., Saywell, R. M., Muegge, C. M., Bogda, L. J., Wooldridge, J. S., & Cummings, S. F. (2005). The impact of household smoking on child tobacco use, attitudes and knowledge. International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, 43(2), 45-50. https://doi.org/10.1080/14635240.2005.10708038

    The impact of household smoking on child tobacco use, attitudes and knowledge. / Zollinger, Terrell W.; Saywell, Robert M.; Muegge, Carolyn M.; Bogda, Lora J.; Wooldridge, J. Scott; Cummings, Sandra F.

    In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 45-50.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Zollinger, TW, Saywell, RM, Muegge, CM, Bogda, LJ, Wooldridge, JS & Cummings, SF 2005, 'The impact of household smoking on child tobacco use, attitudes and knowledge', International Journal of Health Promotion and Education, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 45-50. https://doi.org/10.1080/14635240.2005.10708038
    Zollinger, Terrell W. ; Saywell, Robert M. ; Muegge, Carolyn M. ; Bogda, Lora J. ; Wooldridge, J. Scott ; Cummings, Sandra F. / The impact of household smoking on child tobacco use, attitudes and knowledge. In: International Journal of Health Promotion and Education. 2005 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 45-50.
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