The importance of spirituality in African-Americans' end-of-life experience

William T. Branch, Alexia Torke, Robin C. Brown-Haithco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A profound and moving spirituality provided emotional and psychological support for most terminally ill patients at Grady Memorial Hospital. The authors were able to trace the roots of these patients' spirituality to core beliefs described by African-American theologians. Truly bedrock beliefs often reflected in conversations with the patients at Grady included the providence of God and the divine plan for each person's life. Patients felt an intimate relationship to God, which they expressed through prayer. Importantly, almost all patients were willing to share their beliefs with the authors in long bedside interviews. This willingness to share indicates that physicians can learn about and validate such patients' spiritual sources of support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1203-1205
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of General Internal Medicine
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spirituality
African Americans
Terminally Ill
Religion
Interviews
Psychology
Physicians

Keywords

  • Palliative care
  • Patient-doctor communication
  • Spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The importance of spirituality in African-Americans' end-of-life experience. / Branch, William T.; Torke, Alexia; Brown-Haithco, Robin C.

In: Journal of General Internal Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 1203-1205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Branch, William T. ; Torke, Alexia ; Brown-Haithco, Robin C. / The importance of spirituality in African-Americans' end-of-life experience. In: Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 1203-1205.
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