The influence of hardness and chemical composition on enamel demineralization and subsequent remineralization

Rana Alkattan, Frank Lippert, Qing Tang, George J. Eckert, Masatoshi Ando

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives were to investigate the hardness and chemical composition of sound, demineralized and pH-cycled bovine enamel and determine their influence on demineralization and remineralization behavior. Methods: Ninety-four, 5 × 5 × 2-mm bovine enamel specimens were demineralized using three different times [(24 h (n = 33), 48 h (n = 30), 96 h (n = 31)]. The specimens were then pH-cycled using either 367 ppm F sodium fluoride or deionized water. Knoop hardness (HK) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (measured elements: Ca, P, F, C, Mg, N) were performed at three stages (sound, after demineralization, after pH-cycling) and transverse microradiography was performed after demineralization and pH-cycling. Comparisons were determined by ANOVA. Results: Results showed that HK, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were significantly different between stages, demineralization times and treatments. The weight% of F at the surface was significantly affected by treatment, irrespective of demineralization time, while the Ca:P ratio of the enamel remained stable even after de- and remineralization protocols. The F in fluoride groups and the artificial saliva in non-fluoride groups were both able to induce enamel remineralization, indicating the protective effect of salivary pellicle against demineralization even in the absence of fluoride. Conclusions: Harder specimens and those with greater surface F weight% were less susceptible to demineralization and were more likely to remineralize. However, the amount of surface Ca and P did not influence de- or remineralization behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Dentistry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hardness
Dental Enamel
Fluorides
Dental Pellicle
Microradiography
Artificial Saliva
X-Ray Emission Spectrometry
Weights and Measures
Sodium Fluoride
Minerals
Analysis of Variance
Water

Keywords

  • Bovine
  • Chemical
  • Composition
  • Enamel
  • Hardness
  • Mineral

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The influence of hardness and chemical composition on enamel demineralization and subsequent remineralization. / Alkattan, Rana; Lippert, Frank; Tang, Qing; Eckert, George J.; Ando, Masatoshi.

In: Journal of Dentistry, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{dd507fe639414bd2aa0e7482a06787bd,
title = "The influence of hardness and chemical composition on enamel demineralization and subsequent remineralization",
abstract = "Objectives: The objectives were to investigate the hardness and chemical composition of sound, demineralized and pH-cycled bovine enamel and determine their influence on demineralization and remineralization behavior. Methods: Ninety-four, 5 × 5 × 2-mm bovine enamel specimens were demineralized using three different times [(24 h (n = 33), 48 h (n = 30), 96 h (n = 31)]. The specimens were then pH-cycled using either 367 ppm F sodium fluoride or deionized water. Knoop hardness (HK) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (measured elements: Ca, P, F, C, Mg, N) were performed at three stages (sound, after demineralization, after pH-cycling) and transverse microradiography was performed after demineralization and pH-cycling. Comparisons were determined by ANOVA. Results: Results showed that HK, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were significantly different between stages, demineralization times and treatments. The weight{\%} of F at the surface was significantly affected by treatment, irrespective of demineralization time, while the Ca:P ratio of the enamel remained stable even after de- and remineralization protocols. The F in fluoride groups and the artificial saliva in non-fluoride groups were both able to induce enamel remineralization, indicating the protective effect of salivary pellicle against demineralization even in the absence of fluoride. Conclusions: Harder specimens and those with greater surface F weight{\%} were less susceptible to demineralization and were more likely to remineralize. However, the amount of surface Ca and P did not influence de- or remineralization behavior.",
keywords = "Bovine, Chemical, Composition, Enamel, Hardness, Mineral",
author = "Rana Alkattan and Frank Lippert and Qing Tang and Eckert, {George J.} and Masatoshi Ando",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdent.2018.05.002",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Dentistry",
issn = "0300-5712",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of hardness and chemical composition on enamel demineralization and subsequent remineralization

AU - Alkattan, Rana

AU - Lippert, Frank

AU - Tang, Qing

AU - Eckert, George J.

AU - Ando, Masatoshi

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objectives: The objectives were to investigate the hardness and chemical composition of sound, demineralized and pH-cycled bovine enamel and determine their influence on demineralization and remineralization behavior. Methods: Ninety-four, 5 × 5 × 2-mm bovine enamel specimens were demineralized using three different times [(24 h (n = 33), 48 h (n = 30), 96 h (n = 31)]. The specimens were then pH-cycled using either 367 ppm F sodium fluoride or deionized water. Knoop hardness (HK) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (measured elements: Ca, P, F, C, Mg, N) were performed at three stages (sound, after demineralization, after pH-cycling) and transverse microradiography was performed after demineralization and pH-cycling. Comparisons were determined by ANOVA. Results: Results showed that HK, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were significantly different between stages, demineralization times and treatments. The weight% of F at the surface was significantly affected by treatment, irrespective of demineralization time, while the Ca:P ratio of the enamel remained stable even after de- and remineralization protocols. The F in fluoride groups and the artificial saliva in non-fluoride groups were both able to induce enamel remineralization, indicating the protective effect of salivary pellicle against demineralization even in the absence of fluoride. Conclusions: Harder specimens and those with greater surface F weight% were less susceptible to demineralization and were more likely to remineralize. However, the amount of surface Ca and P did not influence de- or remineralization behavior.

AB - Objectives: The objectives were to investigate the hardness and chemical composition of sound, demineralized and pH-cycled bovine enamel and determine their influence on demineralization and remineralization behavior. Methods: Ninety-four, 5 × 5 × 2-mm bovine enamel specimens were demineralized using three different times [(24 h (n = 33), 48 h (n = 30), 96 h (n = 31)]. The specimens were then pH-cycled using either 367 ppm F sodium fluoride or deionized water. Knoop hardness (HK) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (measured elements: Ca, P, F, C, Mg, N) were performed at three stages (sound, after demineralization, after pH-cycling) and transverse microradiography was performed after demineralization and pH-cycling. Comparisons were determined by ANOVA. Results: Results showed that HK, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were significantly different between stages, demineralization times and treatments. The weight% of F at the surface was significantly affected by treatment, irrespective of demineralization time, while the Ca:P ratio of the enamel remained stable even after de- and remineralization protocols. The F in fluoride groups and the artificial saliva in non-fluoride groups were both able to induce enamel remineralization, indicating the protective effect of salivary pellicle against demineralization even in the absence of fluoride. Conclusions: Harder specimens and those with greater surface F weight% were less susceptible to demineralization and were more likely to remineralize. However, the amount of surface Ca and P did not influence de- or remineralization behavior.

KW - Bovine

KW - Chemical

KW - Composition

KW - Enamel

KW - Hardness

KW - Mineral

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047632809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047632809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdent.2018.05.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jdent.2018.05.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85047632809

JO - Journal of Dentistry

JF - Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0300-5712

ER -