The Long-term Effects of a Self-management Program for Inner-city Primary Care Patients with Acute Low Back Pain

Teresa Damush, Morris Weinberger, Susan Perkins, Jaya K. Rao, William M. Tierney, Rong Qi, Daniel Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We evaluated the effect of a self-management program for low-income primary care patients with acute low back pain (ALBP) from inner-city neighborhood health centers. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a self-management program compared with usual care at university-affiliated neighborhood health centers and an emergency department of an inner-city public teaching hospital. We enrolled 211 patients who visited a physician for ALBP (<90 days' duration). The self-management program consisted of 3 group sessions and telephone follow-up that focused on understanding back pain, increasing physical activity, and dealing with fears and frustrations. Results: At baseline, 4 months, and 12 months, blinded interviewers assessed back pain physical function (Roland Disability Questionnaire), health status (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales), self-efficacy, and time spent in physical activity. Compared with patients receiving usual care, intervention patients reported significantly better scores on the Roland Disability Questionnaire (P = .009), mental functioning (P = .009), self-efficacy to manage ALBP (P = .03), time spent in physical activity (P = .047), and reduced fears of movement/reinjury (P = .005) after 12 months. Conclusion: A self-management program can improve and maintain functional status, mental functioning, and self-efficacy to manage future symptoms for 1 year among primary care patients with ALBP living in the urban, inner city.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2632-2638
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume163
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2003

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Self Care
Low Back Pain
Primary Health Care
Self Efficacy
Community Health Centers
Exercise
Back Pain
Fear
Frustration
Public Hospitals
Urban Hospitals
Telephone
Teaching Hospitals
Health Status
Arthritis
Hospital Emergency Service
Patient Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Interviews
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The Long-term Effects of a Self-management Program for Inner-city Primary Care Patients with Acute Low Back Pain. / Damush, Teresa; Weinberger, Morris; Perkins, Susan; Rao, Jaya K.; Tierney, William M.; Qi, Rong; Clark, Daniel.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 163, No. 21, 24.11.2003, p. 2632-2638.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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