The morphology of the renal microvasculature in glycerol- and gentamicin-induced acute renal failure

Vincent H. Gattone, Andrew Evan, Stephen A. Mong, Bret A. Connors, George R. Aronoff, Friedrich C. Luft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

To elucidate abnormalities in the renal microvasculature that could account for the functional disturbances occurring in two well-established models of acute renal failure, we gave rats a single intramuscular injection of glycerol (50%, 10 ml/kg) or daily subcutaneous doses of gentamicin (100 mg/kg/day). Afferent arteriolar diameters were determined by measuring methacrylate vascular casts with SEM. The filtration barrier was examined by both SEM and TEM. The EF area was quantitated. By 3 hr, the glycerol treatment markedly decreased PADs and DADs (PAD 19.1 to 12.0 μm, DAD 13.8 to 7.4 μm, p < 0.05). The changes were similar for both inner and outer cortical regions. By 3 days the vasoconstriction was alleviated; however, renal failure persisted. At that time, however, EF area was decreased to 43% of normal. After 10 days of gentamicin treatment, only minimal vasoconstriction occurred in the outer cortex; however, EF area was decreased to a similar degree as observed with the 3-day glycerol-treated animals. There are two phases to glycerol-induced acute renal failure. The first phase (described as readily reversible) is characterized by intense vasoconstriction. The second phase, which is not immediately reversible, is associated with a decreased EF area. Smaller outer cortical afferent arterioles and a decreased fenestral diameter and density of the glomerular endothelium are seen only after gentamicin-induced renal failure is well established (after 10 days of treatment).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-195
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume101
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983

Fingerprint

Microvessels
Gentamicins
Acute Kidney Injury
Glycerol
Vasoconstriction
Kidney
Renal Insufficiency
Scanning electron microscopy
Methacrylates
Intramuscular Injections
Arterioles
Endothelium
Blood Vessels
Rats
Animals
Therapeutics
Transmission electron microscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Gattone, V. H., Evan, A., Mong, S. A., Connors, B. A., Aronoff, G. R., & Luft, F. C. (1983). The morphology of the renal microvasculature in glycerol- and gentamicin-induced acute renal failure. Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, 101(2), 183-195.

The morphology of the renal microvasculature in glycerol- and gentamicin-induced acute renal failure. / Gattone, Vincent H.; Evan, Andrew; Mong, Stephen A.; Connors, Bret A.; Aronoff, George R.; Luft, Friedrich C.

In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, Vol. 101, No. 2, 1983, p. 183-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gattone, Vincent H. ; Evan, Andrew ; Mong, Stephen A. ; Connors, Bret A. ; Aronoff, George R. ; Luft, Friedrich C. / The morphology of the renal microvasculature in glycerol- and gentamicin-induced acute renal failure. In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine. 1983 ; Vol. 101, No. 2. pp. 183-195.
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