The natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis

T. Ryan Heider, Samreen Azeem, Joseph A. Galanko, Kevin E. Behrns, William H. Nealon, Attila Nakeeb, Layton F. Rikkers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis with particular attention to the risk of gastric variceal hemorrhage. Summary Background Data: Previous studies have suggested that splenic vein thrombosis results in a high likelihood of gastric variceal bleeding and that splenectomy should be performed to prevent hemorrhage. Recent improvements in cross-sectional imaging have led to the identification of splenic vein thrombosis in patients with minimal symptoms. Our clinical experience suggested that gastric variceal bleeding in these patients was uncommon. Methods: A computerized index search from 1993 to 2002 for the medical records of patients with a diagnosis of pancreatitis was performed. Fifty-three patients with a diagnosis of pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis were identified. The medical records of these patients were reviewed, and follow-up was completed, including the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). Results: Gastrosplenic varices were identified in 41 patients (77%) with varices evident on computed tomography (CT) in 40 of 53 patients, on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in 11 of 36 patients, and on both CT and EGD in 10 of 36 patients. This risk of variceal bleeding was 5% for patients with CT-identified varices and 18% for EGD-identified varices. Overall, only 2 patients (4%) had gastric variceal bleeding and required splenectomy. Functional quality of life was better than historical controls surgically treated for chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: Gastric variceal bleeding from pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis occurs in only 4% of patients; therefore, routine splenectomy is not recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)876-882
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume239
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Splenic Vein
Pancreatitis
Thrombosis
Hemorrhage
Varicose Veins
Stomach
Digestive System Endoscopy
Splenectomy
Tomography
Medical Records
Quality of Life
Chronic Pancreatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Heider, T. R., Azeem, S., Galanko, J. A., Behrns, K. E., Nealon, W. H., Nakeeb, A., & Rikkers, L. F. (2004). The natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis. Annals of Surgery, 239(6), 876-882. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.sla.0000128685.74686.1e

The natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis. / Heider, T. Ryan; Azeem, Samreen; Galanko, Joseph A.; Behrns, Kevin E.; Nealon, William H.; Nakeeb, Attila; Rikkers, Layton F.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 239, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 876-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heider, TR, Azeem, S, Galanko, JA, Behrns, KE, Nealon, WH, Nakeeb, A & Rikkers, LF 2004, 'The natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis', Annals of Surgery, vol. 239, no. 6, pp. 876-882. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.sla.0000128685.74686.1e
Heider, T. Ryan ; Azeem, Samreen ; Galanko, Joseph A. ; Behrns, Kevin E. ; Nealon, William H. ; Nakeeb, Attila ; Rikkers, Layton F. / The natural history of pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis. In: Annals of Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 239, No. 6. pp. 876-882.
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