The pathogenesis of reactive systemic amyloidosis.

S. P. DiBartola, Merrill Benson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The diagnosis of amyloidosis is based on the presence of extracellular tissue deposits of proteinaceous material that demonstrate a characteristic green color when stained with Congo red and viewed under polarized light. Several different proteins are amyloidogenic but, in domestic animals, spontaneously occurring systemic amyloidosis is reactive in nature and characterized by the presence of amyloid protein AA. This type of systemic amyloidosis may occur secondary to chronic inflammatory or neoplastic disease, but in many instances no predisposing disease is found. A sustained increase in the serum concentration of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of reactive amyloidosis. Other inherited and acquired host-related factors are likely to be important in the development of reactive amyloidosis because this condition develops in few patients with chronic inflammatory disease. The tissue tropism of amyloid deposits varies with the amyloid protein itself and species affected. The consequences of amyloidosis for the host depend upon the tissues involved and the response of these tissues to the presence of the amyloid deposits. In domestic animals, reactive systemic amyloidosis is nephropathic, leading to end-stage renal disease, and the clinical presentation is that of uremia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume3
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1989

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amyloidosis
Amyloidosis
pathogenesis
amyloid
Amyloidogenic Proteins
Serum Amyloid A Protein
Domestic Animals
Amyloid Plaques
domestic animals
proteins
tissue tropism
Congo Red
polarized light
Tropism
uremia
Uremia
Republic of the Congo
kidney diseases
Chronic Kidney Failure
Chronic Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

The pathogenesis of reactive systemic amyloidosis. / DiBartola, S. P.; Benson, Merrill.

In: Journal of veterinary internal medicine / American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.1989, p. 31-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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