The photoreactivity of the retinal age pigment lipofuscin

Julie Wassell, Sallyanne Davies, William Bardsley, Mike Boulton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presence of the age pigment lipofuscin is associated with numerous age-related diseases. In the retina lipofuscin is located within the pigment epithelium where it is exposed to high oxygen and visible light, a prime environment for the generation of reactive oxygen species. Although we, and others, have demonstrated that retinal lipofuscin is a photoinducible generator of reactive oxygen species it is unclear how this may translate into cell damage. The position of lipofuscin within the lysosome infers that irradiated lipofuscin is liable to cause oxidative damage to either the lysosomal membrane or the lysosomal enzymes. We have found that illumination of lipofuscin with visible light is capable of extragranular lipid peroxidation, enzyme inactivation, and protein oxidation. These effects, which were pH-dependent, were significantly reduced by the addition of the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase and 1,4-diazabicyclo(2,2,2)-octane, confirming a role for both the superoxide anion and singlet oxygen. We postulate that lipofuscin may compromise retinal cell function by causing loss of lysosomal integrity and that this may be a major contributory factor to the pathology associated with retinal light damage and diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23828-23832
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume274
Issue number34
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Photoreactivity
Lipofuscin
Retinal Pigments
Pigments
Light
Reactive Oxygen Species
Cells
Singlet Oxygen
Macular Degeneration
Pathology
Enzymes
Lysosomes
Lighting
Superoxides
Lipid Peroxidation
Superoxide Dismutase
Retina
Epithelium
Antioxidants
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Wassell, J., Davies, S., Bardsley, W., & Boulton, M. (1999). The photoreactivity of the retinal age pigment lipofuscin. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(34), 23828-23832. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.274.34.23828

The photoreactivity of the retinal age pigment lipofuscin. / Wassell, Julie; Davies, Sallyanne; Bardsley, William; Boulton, Mike.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 274, No. 34, 20.08.1999, p. 23828-23832.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wassell, J, Davies, S, Bardsley, W & Boulton, M 1999, 'The photoreactivity of the retinal age pigment lipofuscin', Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 274, no. 34, pp. 23828-23832. https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.274.34.23828
Wassell, Julie ; Davies, Sallyanne ; Bardsley, William ; Boulton, Mike. / The photoreactivity of the retinal age pigment lipofuscin. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 1999 ; Vol. 274, No. 34. pp. 23828-23832.
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