The Prevalence of Coffee Drinking Among Hospitalized and Population-Based Control Groups

Debra T. Silverman, Robert N. Hoover, G. Marie Swanson, Patricia Hartge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data on coffee-drinking habits obtained from a case-control study conducted in Detroit were used to compare the proportions of coffee drinkers in a hospital and a population control series. The comparison was based on interviews with 262 hospitalized controls and 427 population controls. The overall proportion of coffee drinkers in the total hospital control group was similar to that in the population control group. However, the proportion of moderate-to-heavy coffee drinkers among controls hospitalized for conditions that may have caused them to alter their diet (eg, gastrointestinal disorders and cardiovascular disease) was lower than that among population controls. In contrast, the proportion of moderate-to-heavy coffee drinkers among controls hospitalized for conditions that probably did not cause a change in diet (eg, fractures) was almost identical to that among population controls. These results suggest that, in hospital-based casecontrol studies of the effects of coffee consumption, it would be prudent to restrict the referent group to those patients hospitalized for conditions that probably did not cause a change in diet. The magnitude of bias resulting from failure to exclude controls hospitalized for diet-altering conditions will depend on two factors that may vary between studies: (1) the distribution of diet-altering conditions among the hospital controls, and (2) the relationship of these diseases to coffee consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1877-1880
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume249
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Population Control
Coffee
Drinking
Control Groups
Diet
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Population Groups
Habits
Case-Control Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Prevalence of Coffee Drinking Among Hospitalized and Population-Based Control Groups. / Silverman, Debra T.; Hoover, Robert N.; Swanson, G. Marie; Hartge, Patricia.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 249, No. 14, 08.04.1983, p. 1877-1880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silverman, Debra T. ; Hoover, Robert N. ; Swanson, G. Marie ; Hartge, Patricia. / The Prevalence of Coffee Drinking Among Hospitalized and Population-Based Control Groups. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1983 ; Vol. 249, No. 14. pp. 1877-1880.
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