The prevention of type 2 diabetes

Jill P. Crandall, William C. Knowler, Steven E. Kahn, David Marrero, Jose C. Florez, George A. Bray, Steven M. Haffner, Mary Hoskin, David M. Nathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects more than 7% of adults in the US and leads to substantial personal and economic burden. In prediabetic states insulin secretion and action - potential targets of preventive interventions - are impaired. In trials lifestyle modification (i.e. weight loss and exercise) has proven effective in preventing incident T2DM in high-risk groups, although weight loss has the greatest effect. Various medications (e.g. metformin, thiazolidinediones and acarbose) can also prevent or delay T2DM. Whether diabetes-prevention strategies also ultimately prevent the development of diabetic vascular complications is unknown, but cardiovascular risk factors are favorably affected. Preventive strategies that can be implemented in routine clinical settings have been developed and evaluated. Widespread application has, however, been limited by local financial considerations, even though cost-effectiveness might be achieved at the population level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)382-393
Number of pages12
JournalNature Clinical Practice Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume4
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Loss
Acarbose
Prediabetic State
Diabetic Angiopathies
Thiazolidinediones
Metformin
Action Potentials
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Life Style
Economics
Insulin
Population

Keywords

  • Impaired glucose tolerance
  • Prediabetes
  • Prevention
  • Type 2 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Crandall, J. P., Knowler, W. C., Kahn, S. E., Marrero, D., Florez, J. C., Bray, G. A., ... Nathan, D. M. (2008). The prevention of type 2 diabetes. Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology and Metabolism, 4(7), 382-393. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncpendmet0843

The prevention of type 2 diabetes. / Crandall, Jill P.; Knowler, William C.; Kahn, Steven E.; Marrero, David; Florez, Jose C.; Bray, George A.; Haffner, Steven M.; Hoskin, Mary; Nathan, David M.

In: Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 4, No. 7, 07.2008, p. 382-393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crandall, JP, Knowler, WC, Kahn, SE, Marrero, D, Florez, JC, Bray, GA, Haffner, SM, Hoskin, M & Nathan, DM 2008, 'The prevention of type 2 diabetes', Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. 382-393. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncpendmet0843
Crandall, Jill P. ; Knowler, William C. ; Kahn, Steven E. ; Marrero, David ; Florez, Jose C. ; Bray, George A. ; Haffner, Steven M. ; Hoskin, Mary ; Nathan, David M. / The prevention of type 2 diabetes. In: Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 7. pp. 382-393.
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