The public health infrastructure and our nation's health

Edward L. Baker, Margaret A. Potter, Deborah L. Jones, Shawna L. Mercer, Joan P. Cioffi, Lawrence W. Green, Paul Halverson, Maureen Y. Lichtveld, David W. Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Threats to Americans' health - including chronic disease, emerging infectious disease, and bioterrorism - are present and growing, and the public health system is responsible for addressing these challenges. Public health systems in the United States are built on an infrastructure of workforce, information systems, and organizational capacity; in each of these areas, however, serious deficits have been well documented. Here we draw on two 2003 Institute of Medicine reports and present evidence for current threats and the weakness of our public health infrastructure. We describe major initiatives to systematically assess, invest in, rebuild, and evaluate workforce competency, information systems, and organizational capacity through public policy making, practical initiatives, and practice-oriented research. These initiatives are based on applied science and a shared federal-state approach to public accountability. We conclude that a newly strengthened public health infrastructure must be sustained in the future through a balancing of the values inherent in the federal system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-318
Number of pages16
JournalAnnual Review of Public Health
Volume26
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Health
Health
Information Systems
Emerging Communicable Diseases
Bioterrorism
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Policy Making
Social Responsibility
Public Policy
Chronic Disease
Research

Keywords

  • Information systems
  • Organizational capacity
  • Public health preparedness
  • Workforce development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Baker, E. L., Potter, M. A., Jones, D. L., Mercer, S. L., Cioffi, J. P., Green, L. W., ... Fleming, D. W. (2005). The public health infrastructure and our nation's health. Annual Review of Public Health, 26, 303-318. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.publhealth.26.021304.144647

The public health infrastructure and our nation's health. / Baker, Edward L.; Potter, Margaret A.; Jones, Deborah L.; Mercer, Shawna L.; Cioffi, Joan P.; Green, Lawrence W.; Halverson, Paul; Lichtveld, Maureen Y.; Fleming, David W.

In: Annual Review of Public Health, Vol. 26, 02.05.2005, p. 303-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baker, EL, Potter, MA, Jones, DL, Mercer, SL, Cioffi, JP, Green, LW, Halverson, P, Lichtveld, MY & Fleming, DW 2005, 'The public health infrastructure and our nation's health', Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 26, pp. 303-318. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.publhealth.26.021304.144647
Baker, Edward L. ; Potter, Margaret A. ; Jones, Deborah L. ; Mercer, Shawna L. ; Cioffi, Joan P. ; Green, Lawrence W. ; Halverson, Paul ; Lichtveld, Maureen Y. ; Fleming, David W. / The public health infrastructure and our nation's health. In: Annual Review of Public Health. 2005 ; Vol. 26. pp. 303-318.
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