The relationship between parental alcoholism and adolescent psychopathology: A systematic examination of parental comorbid Psychopathology

Christine Mc Cauley Ohannessian, Victor M. Hesselbrock, John Kramer, Samuel Kuperman, Kathleen K. Bucholz, Marc A. Schuckit, John I. Nurnberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship between parental alcohol dependence (with and without comorbid psychopathology) and adolescent psychopathology was examined in a sample of 665 13-17 year-old adolescents and their parents. Results indicated that adolescents who had parents diagnosed with alcohol dependence only did not significantly differ from adolescents who had parents with no psychopathology in regard to any of the measures of psychological symptomatology (substance use, conduct disorder, and depression) or clinical diagnoses (alcohol dependence, marijuana dependence, conduct disorder, or depression) assessed. In contrast, adolescents who had parents diagnosed with alcohol dependence and either comorbid drug dependence or depression were more likely to exhibit higher levels of psychological symptomatology. In addition, adolescents who had parents diagnosed with alcohol dependence, depression, and drug dependence were most likely to exhibit psychological problems. These findings underscore the importance of considering parental comorbid psychopathology when examining the relationship between parental alcoholism and offspring adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-533
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • COAs
  • comorbidity
  • conduct disorder
  • depression
  • substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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