The relationship of level of positive mental health with current mental disorders in predicting suicidal behavior and academic impairment in college students

Corey L.M. Keyes, Daniel Eisenberg, Geraldine S. Perry, Shanta R. Dube, Kurt Kroenke, Satvinder S. Dhingra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether level of positive mental health complements mental illness in predicting students at risk for suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance. Participants: A sample of 5,689 college students participated in the 2007 Healthy Minds Study and completed an Internet survey that included the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form and the Patient Health Questionnaire screening scales for depression and anxiety disorders, questions about suicide ideation, plans, and attempts, and academic impairment. Results: Just under half (49.3%) of students were flourishing and did not screen positive for a mental disorder. Among students who did, and those who did not, screen for a mental disorder, suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance were lowest in those with flourishing, higher among those with moderate, and highest in those with languishing mental health. Conclusions: Positive mental health complements mental disorder screening in mental health surveillance and prediction of suicidal behavior and impairment of academic performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-133
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mental Health Continuum- Short Form (MHC-SF)
  • Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)
  • flourishing
  • happiness
  • mental illness
  • positive mental health
  • subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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