The role of central nervous system functioning and family functioning in behavioral problems of children with myelodysplasia

Robert J. Thompson, William G. Kronenberger, Debra F. Johnson, Kimberly Whiting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the frequency and type of behavioral problems in 50 children with myelodysplasia and investigated the hypothesized roles of central nervous system (CNS) functioning and family functioning in behavioral problem outcome. The findings revealed that 50% of the children with myelodysplasia had a behavioral problem pattern and another 2% had low social skills, yielding an overall problem pattern rate of 52%. There was a high frequency of internalizing behavior problem profiles and a very low frequency of externalizing behavior problem profiles. Although there was little support for the hypothesized mediating role of central nervous system functioning, considerable support was provided for the association of family functioning and behavior problem outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-248
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume10
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1989
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Behavioral problems
  • Family functioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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