The role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the initial evaluation of childhood inflammatory bowel disease

A 7-year study

Bisher A. Abdullah, Sandeep Gupta, Joseph Croffie, Marian Pfefferkorn, Jean Molleston, Mark R. Corkins, Joseph F. Fitzgerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess the role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: All children with inflammatory bowel disease who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy during their initial evaluation at our institution during a 7-year period (December 1993 to November 2000) were included in the study. Results: The study included 115 patients: 81 with Crohn disease (mean age, 11.34 years; 42 males) and 34 with ulcerative colitis (mean age, 11.79 years; 20 males). Abnormal findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy were noted in 64% of patients with Crohn disease and 50% of children with ulcerative colitis; histologic abnormalities were found in 81.6% and 70.6% of the patients, respectively. Granulomas were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 23 of 81 patients (28.4%), with the most common site being the gastric mucosa. Nine of these 23 patients had granulomas solely in the upper gastrointestinal tract, Additional unsuspected pathology noted included: candidiasis, hiatal hernia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and giardiasis. Conclusions: Endoscopic and histologic abnormalities were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of a significant number of children with inflammatory bowel disease. While the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities in patients with ulcerative colitis is unclear, the pathology can contribute to the patient's clinical condition. Pathology in the upper gastrointestinal tract should not exclude a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Granulomas, confirming the diagnosis of Crohn disease, were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 28% of our patients with Crohn disease. In some cases, granulomas were found solely in the upper gastrointestinal tracts. Based on our data, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy should be performed in all pediatric patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)636-640
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002

Fingerprint

gastrointestinal endoscopy
Digestive System Endoscopy
inflammatory bowel disease
childhood
Upper Gastrointestinal Tract
gastrointestinal system
Crohn disease
colitis
granuloma
Granuloma
Ulcerative Colitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Crohn Disease
Pathology
hiatal hernia
giardiasis
Giardiasis
Inflammatory Bowel Disease 7
Hiatal Hernia
candidiasis

Keywords

  • Crohn disease
  • Esophagogastroduodenoscopy
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Gastroenterology
  • Histology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{687042cc301b405696b41d3b1620bae6,
title = "The role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the initial evaluation of childhood inflammatory bowel disease: A 7-year study",
abstract = "Objectives: To assess the role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: All children with inflammatory bowel disease who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy during their initial evaluation at our institution during a 7-year period (December 1993 to November 2000) were included in the study. Results: The study included 115 patients: 81 with Crohn disease (mean age, 11.34 years; 42 males) and 34 with ulcerative colitis (mean age, 11.79 years; 20 males). Abnormal findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy were noted in 64{\%} of patients with Crohn disease and 50{\%} of children with ulcerative colitis; histologic abnormalities were found in 81.6{\%} and 70.6{\%} of the patients, respectively. Granulomas were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 23 of 81 patients (28.4{\%}), with the most common site being the gastric mucosa. Nine of these 23 patients had granulomas solely in the upper gastrointestinal tract, Additional unsuspected pathology noted included: candidiasis, hiatal hernia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and giardiasis. Conclusions: Endoscopic and histologic abnormalities were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of a significant number of children with inflammatory bowel disease. While the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities in patients with ulcerative colitis is unclear, the pathology can contribute to the patient's clinical condition. Pathology in the upper gastrointestinal tract should not exclude a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Granulomas, confirming the diagnosis of Crohn disease, were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 28{\%} of our patients with Crohn disease. In some cases, granulomas were found solely in the upper gastrointestinal tracts. Based on our data, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy should be performed in all pediatric patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease.",
keywords = "Crohn disease, Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, Inflammatory bowel disease, Ulcerative colitis",
author = "Abdullah, {Bisher A.} and Sandeep Gupta and Joseph Croffie and Marian Pfefferkorn and Jean Molleston and Corkins, {Mark R.} and Fitzgerald, {Joseph F.}",
year = "2002",
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language = "English",
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T1 - The role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the initial evaluation of childhood inflammatory bowel disease

T2 - A 7-year study

AU - Abdullah, Bisher A.

AU - Gupta, Sandeep

AU - Croffie, Joseph

AU - Pfefferkorn, Marian

AU - Molleston, Jean

AU - Corkins, Mark R.

AU - Fitzgerald, Joseph F.

PY - 2002/11

Y1 - 2002/11

N2 - Objectives: To assess the role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: All children with inflammatory bowel disease who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy during their initial evaluation at our institution during a 7-year period (December 1993 to November 2000) were included in the study. Results: The study included 115 patients: 81 with Crohn disease (mean age, 11.34 years; 42 males) and 34 with ulcerative colitis (mean age, 11.79 years; 20 males). Abnormal findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy were noted in 64% of patients with Crohn disease and 50% of children with ulcerative colitis; histologic abnormalities were found in 81.6% and 70.6% of the patients, respectively. Granulomas were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 23 of 81 patients (28.4%), with the most common site being the gastric mucosa. Nine of these 23 patients had granulomas solely in the upper gastrointestinal tract, Additional unsuspected pathology noted included: candidiasis, hiatal hernia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and giardiasis. Conclusions: Endoscopic and histologic abnormalities were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of a significant number of children with inflammatory bowel disease. While the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities in patients with ulcerative colitis is unclear, the pathology can contribute to the patient's clinical condition. Pathology in the upper gastrointestinal tract should not exclude a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Granulomas, confirming the diagnosis of Crohn disease, were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 28% of our patients with Crohn disease. In some cases, granulomas were found solely in the upper gastrointestinal tracts. Based on our data, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy should be performed in all pediatric patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease.

AB - Objectives: To assess the role of esophagogastroduodenoscopy in the evaluation of children with suspected inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: All children with inflammatory bowel disease who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy during their initial evaluation at our institution during a 7-year period (December 1993 to November 2000) were included in the study. Results: The study included 115 patients: 81 with Crohn disease (mean age, 11.34 years; 42 males) and 34 with ulcerative colitis (mean age, 11.79 years; 20 males). Abnormal findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy were noted in 64% of patients with Crohn disease and 50% of children with ulcerative colitis; histologic abnormalities were found in 81.6% and 70.6% of the patients, respectively. Granulomas were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 23 of 81 patients (28.4%), with the most common site being the gastric mucosa. Nine of these 23 patients had granulomas solely in the upper gastrointestinal tract, Additional unsuspected pathology noted included: candidiasis, hiatal hernia, Helicobacter pylori infection, and giardiasis. Conclusions: Endoscopic and histologic abnormalities were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of a significant number of children with inflammatory bowel disease. While the mechanism(s) underlying these abnormalities in patients with ulcerative colitis is unclear, the pathology can contribute to the patient's clinical condition. Pathology in the upper gastrointestinal tract should not exclude a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis. Granulomas, confirming the diagnosis of Crohn disease, were found in the upper gastrointestinal tracts of 28% of our patients with Crohn disease. In some cases, granulomas were found solely in the upper gastrointestinal tracts. Based on our data, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy should be performed in all pediatric patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease.

KW - Crohn disease

KW - Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease

KW - Ulcerative colitis

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