The role of self-efficacy and relationship quality in partner notification by adolescents with sexually transmitted infections

J. Fortenberry, Edward J. Brizendine, Barry Katz, Donald P. Orr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the role of self-efficacy, anticipated negative consequences, and relationship quality in patient-initiated sex partner notification following treatment for sexually transmitted infections. Subjects: Two hundred forty-one 13- to 20-year-old subjects (83% women; 83% African American) diagnosed with gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomonas, or non-gonococcal urethritis. Subjects were patients at a public sexually transmitted diseases clinic or primary care adolescent clinics. Methods: Structured interviews at enrollment and 1 month following treatment. At enrollment, recent sexual partners were identified. Coital frequency, partnerspecific sexually transmitted infection notification self-efficacy, anticipated consequences of notification, and relationship quality were measured with multi-item scales. At 1 month, subjects were asked whether partners had been notified and about the timing of notification relative to treatment. Results: Subjects reported 279 partners. Of these, 61% of women's partners and 52% of men's partners were notified. Multiple logistic regression adjusted by generalized estimating equations showed that notification was predicted by antecedent notification self-efficacy (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.30) and relationship quality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.27). Age, sex, race/ethnicity, prior sexually transmitted infection, coital frequency, and anticipated consequences were not related to partner notification. Conclusions: Partner notification is increased among persons with higher levels of self-efficacy and in relationships with stronger affiliative and emotional ties. Self-efficacy and partner communication could be especially amenable to interventions to increase patient-initiated partner notification for curable sexually transmitted infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1133-1137
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume156
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

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Contact Tracing
Self Efficacy
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Coitus
Odds Ratio
Trichomonas
Confidence Intervals
Urethritis
Chlamydia
Gonorrhea
Sexual Partners
Interpersonal Relations
African Americans
Primary Health Care
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The role of self-efficacy and relationship quality in partner notification by adolescents with sexually transmitted infections. / Fortenberry, J.; Brizendine, Edward J.; Katz, Barry; Orr, Donald P.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 156, No. 11, 01.11.2002, p. 1133-1137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the role of self-efficacy, anticipated negative consequences, and relationship quality in patient-initiated sex partner notification following treatment for sexually transmitted infections. Subjects: Two hundred forty-one 13- to 20-year-old subjects (83{\%} women; 83{\%} African American) diagnosed with gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomonas, or non-gonococcal urethritis. Subjects were patients at a public sexually transmitted diseases clinic or primary care adolescent clinics. Methods: Structured interviews at enrollment and 1 month following treatment. At enrollment, recent sexual partners were identified. Coital frequency, partnerspecific sexually transmitted infection notification self-efficacy, anticipated consequences of notification, and relationship quality were measured with multi-item scales. At 1 month, subjects were asked whether partners had been notified and about the timing of notification relative to treatment. Results: Subjects reported 279 partners. Of these, 61{\%} of women's partners and 52{\%} of men's partners were notified. Multiple logistic regression adjusted by generalized estimating equations showed that notification was predicted by antecedent notification self-efficacy (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.03-1.30) and relationship quality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.17; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.08-1.27). Age, sex, race/ethnicity, prior sexually transmitted infection, coital frequency, and anticipated consequences were not related to partner notification. Conclusions: Partner notification is increased among persons with higher levels of self-efficacy and in relationships with stronger affiliative and emotional ties. Self-efficacy and partner communication could be especially amenable to interventions to increase patient-initiated partner notification for curable sexually transmitted infections.",
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