The Role of Sexually Explicit Material in the Sexual Development of Same-Sex-Attracted Black Adolescent Males

Renata Arrington-Sanders, Gary W. Harper, Anthony Morgan, Adedotun Ogunbajo, Maria Trent, J. Fortenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sexually explicit material (SEM) (including Internet, video, and print) may play a key role in the lives of Black same-sex sexually active youth by providing the only information to learn about sexual development. There is limited school- and/or family-based sex education to serve as models for sexual behaviors for Black youth. We describe the role SEM plays in the sexual development of a sample of Black same-sex attracted (SSA) young adolescent males ages 15–19. Adolescents recruited from clinics, social networking sites, and through snowball sampling were invited to participate in a 90-min, semi-structured qualitative interview. Most participants described using SEM prior to their first same-sex sexual experience. Participants described using SEM primarily for sexual development, including learning about sexual organs and function, the mechanics of same-gender sex, and to negotiate one’s sexual identity. Secondary functions were to determine readiness for sex; to learn about sexual performance, including understanding sexual roles and responsibilities (e.g., “top” or “bottom”); to introduce sexual performance scripts; and to develop models for how sex should feel (e.g., pleasure and pain). Youth also described engaging in sexual behaviors (including condom non-use and/or swallowing ejaculate) that were modeled on SEM. Comprehensive sexuality education programs should be designed to address the unmet needs of young, Black SSA men, with explicit focus on sexual roles and behaviors that may be inaccurately portrayed and/or involve sexual risk-taking (such as unprotected anal intercourse and swallowing ejaculate) in SEM. This work also calls for development of Internet-based HIV/STI prevention strategies targeting young Black SSA men who may be accessing SEM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)597-608
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Sexual Development
Sexual Behavior
Deglutition
Internet
Social Networking
Pleasure
Sex Education
Sexual
Condoms
Sexuality
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Risk-Taking
Mechanics
Learning
HIV
Interviews
Education
Pain

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Gay men
  • Sexual identity
  • Sexual orientation
  • Sexually explicit material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The Role of Sexually Explicit Material in the Sexual Development of Same-Sex-Attracted Black Adolescent Males. / Arrington-Sanders, Renata; Harper, Gary W.; Morgan, Anthony; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; Trent, Maria; Fortenberry, J.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 44, No. 3, 2015, p. 597-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arrington-Sanders, Renata ; Harper, Gary W. ; Morgan, Anthony ; Ogunbajo, Adedotun ; Trent, Maria ; Fortenberry, J. / The Role of Sexually Explicit Material in the Sexual Development of Same-Sex-Attracted Black Adolescent Males. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 597-608.
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