The role of superantigens in skin disease

D. Y M Leung, Jeffrey Travers, D. A. Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci secrete a large family of exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of toxic-shock-like syndromes and have been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. These toxins act as prototypic superantigens capable of binding to major histocompatibility complex proteins on antigen-presenting cells outside the antigen peptide-binding groove and can thereby stimulate cytokine release from macrophages. The superantigen-major histocompatibility complex unit is recognized primarily by the variable region of the T-cell receptor beta chain, and by engaging this region, can activate a large portion of the T-cell repertoire. It is thought that the capacity of these toxins to cause the massive stimulation of T cells and accessory cells such as macrophages, Langerhans cells, and activated keratinocytes accounts for most of their pathologic effects. The current review examines the evidence that implicates a role for these superantigens in the pathogenesis of certain skin diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume105
Issue number1 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Superantigens
Skin Diseases
Skin
T-cells
Macrophages
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Antigen Receptors, T-Cell, alpha-beta
T-Lymphocytes
Exotoxins
Langerhans Cells
Poisons
Accessories
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Septic Shock
Streptococcus
Keratinocytes
Staphylococcus aureus
Cytokines
Antigens
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Leung, D. Y. M., Travers, J., & Norris, D. A. (1995). The role of superantigens in skin disease. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 105(1 SUPPL.).

The role of superantigens in skin disease. / Leung, D. Y M; Travers, Jeffrey; Norris, D. A.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 105, No. 1 SUPPL., 1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leung, D. Y M ; Travers, Jeffrey ; Norris, D. A. / The role of superantigens in skin disease. In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1995 ; Vol. 105, No. 1 SUPPL.
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