The roles of injury, nerves, and the wound epidermis during the initiation of amphibian limb regeneration

R. A. Tassava, Anthony Mescher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limbs of several species of salamanders will regenerate completely if amputated. Experiments have shown that if restoration of the missing limb is to occur (1) limb tissues must be injured, (2) a wound epidermis, free of underlying dermis, must cover the amputation surface, and (3) nerves must be present in sufficient quantity at the level of amputation. If any one of these three prerequisites is absent, regeneration does not take place. The exact roles of injury, the wound epidermis, and nerves in the initiation of regeneration are not understood, but recent work has led to the development of a hypothesis which accounts for the necessity of each of these factors for regeneration and which is consistent with virtually all of the extensive literature in the field. The purpose of this communication is to present this hypothesis and review the most pertinent experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-24
Number of pages2
JournalDifferentiation
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amphibians
Epidermis
Regeneration
Extremities
Amputation
Wounds and Injuries
Urodela
Dermis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

The roles of injury, nerves, and the wound epidermis during the initiation of amphibian limb regeneration. / Tassava, R. A.; Mescher, Anthony.

In: Differentiation, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1975, p. 23-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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