The Ross-Konno Procedure in Children

Outcomes, Autograft and Allograft Function, and Reoperations

John Brown, Mark Ruzmetov, Palaniswamy Vijay, Mark Rodefeld, Mark Turrentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The Ross aortic valve replacement with a modified Konno-type enlargement Ross-Konno procedure of the aortic annulus and subannular region allows an autograft aortic valve replacement for children with significant annular and subannular hypoplasia. The potential for growth and the proven durability of the autograft make the Ross-Konno procedure an ideal aortic valve replacement for this subgroup with multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We reviewed our institutional midterm experience to assess autograft and homograft hemodynamics, and management after a Ross-Konno procedure. Methods: Between 1995 and 2005, 14 consecutive children (mean age, 6.4 ± 5.9 years; range, 1 month to 17 years) underwent the Ross-Konno procedure. All children had severe to critical aortic stenosis or multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Results: There was 1 early and 1 late death with a mean follow-up of 5.7 ± 3.6 years. Actuarial survival at 10 years was 86%. Three patients underwent right ventricular outflow tract reoperation for conduit replacement for homograft dysfunction and one patient required redo aortic root replacement with a mechanical valves for progressive aortic insufficiency. Freedom from right ventricular outflow tract and autograft reoperation at 10 years is 77% and 92%, respectively. Aortic annular dilation was not observed in all patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified no risk factors for autograft or homograft valve-related reoperation. Conclusions: The Ross-Konno procedure is an excellent technique to treat complex multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in children with significant annular and subannular hypoplasia. The autograft demonstrated durability without development of aortic stenosis or progressive dilation and a low incidence of developing progressive aortic insufficiency. Enlargement of the aortic annulus appear to parallel somatic growth in most instances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1301-1306
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume82
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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Autografts
Reoperation
Allografts
Ventricular Outflow Obstruction
Aortic Valve
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Dilatation
Aortic Valve Insufficiency
Patient Rights
Growth
Multivariate Analysis
Hemodynamics
Survival
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

The Ross-Konno Procedure in Children : Outcomes, Autograft and Allograft Function, and Reoperations. / Brown, John; Ruzmetov, Mark; Vijay, Palaniswamy; Rodefeld, Mark; Turrentine, Mark.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 82, No. 4, 10.2006, p. 1301-1306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: The Ross aortic valve replacement with a modified Konno-type enlargement Ross-Konno procedure of the aortic annulus and subannular region allows an autograft aortic valve replacement for children with significant annular and subannular hypoplasia. The potential for growth and the proven durability of the autograft make the Ross-Konno procedure an ideal aortic valve replacement for this subgroup with multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We reviewed our institutional midterm experience to assess autograft and homograft hemodynamics, and management after a Ross-Konno procedure. Methods: Between 1995 and 2005, 14 consecutive children (mean age, 6.4 ± 5.9 years; range, 1 month to 17 years) underwent the Ross-Konno procedure. All children had severe to critical aortic stenosis or multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. Results: There was 1 early and 1 late death with a mean follow-up of 5.7 ± 3.6 years. Actuarial survival at 10 years was 86{\%}. Three patients underwent right ventricular outflow tract reoperation for conduit replacement for homograft dysfunction and one patient required redo aortic root replacement with a mechanical valves for progressive aortic insufficiency. Freedom from right ventricular outflow tract and autograft reoperation at 10 years is 77{\%} and 92{\%}, respectively. Aortic annular dilation was not observed in all patients. Univariate and multivariate analysis identified no risk factors for autograft or homograft valve-related reoperation. Conclusions: The Ross-Konno procedure is an excellent technique to treat complex multilevel left ventricular outflow tract obstruction in children with significant annular and subannular hypoplasia. The autograft demonstrated durability without development of aortic stenosis or progressive dilation and a low incidence of developing progressive aortic insufficiency. Enlargement of the aortic annulus appear to parallel somatic growth in most instances.",
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