The sexual partnerships of people with serious mental illness

Brea L. Perry, Eric R. Wright

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    26 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We compared the sexualities of people with serious mental illness and the general population using the National Health and Social Life Survey (Laumann et al., 1994) and the Indiana Mental Health Services and HIV Risk Study (Wright, 1999). We investigated whether and how the sexual behaviors and relationships of people with serious mental illness differ from the general populations' and identified factors differently influencing the organization of sexuality in these two groups. We found evidence that the relationships of people with serious mental illness are characterized by less intimacy and commitment than those of the general population. Additionally, although people with serious mental illness use condoms more consistently, they are also more likely to have concurrent relationships and tend to have sex sooner with new partners, which may contribute to a higher risk of contracting HIV. Our findings point to a need for a paradigm shift in the way that clinicians and researchers conceptualize and manage client sexuality. A less individualistic approach that takes into consideration the relationship context and social and institutional constraints is needed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)174-181
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Sex Research
    Volume43
    Issue number2
    StatePublished - May 2006

    Fingerprint

    Sexuality
    mental illness
    sexuality
    HIV
    Population
    Condoms
    Mental Health Services
    Sexual Behavior
    intimacy
    Research Personnel
    health service
    mental health
    Health
    commitment
    paradigm
    organization
    Mental Illness
    Sexual
    health
    evidence

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychology(all)
    • Clinical Psychology
    • Social Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Perry, B. L., & Wright, E. R. (2006). The sexual partnerships of people with serious mental illness. Journal of Sex Research, 43(2), 174-181.

    The sexual partnerships of people with serious mental illness. / Perry, Brea L.; Wright, Eric R.

    In: Journal of Sex Research, Vol. 43, No. 2, 05.2006, p. 174-181.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Perry, BL & Wright, ER 2006, 'The sexual partnerships of people with serious mental illness', Journal of Sex Research, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 174-181.
    Perry, Brea L. ; Wright, Eric R. / The sexual partnerships of people with serious mental illness. In: Journal of Sex Research. 2006 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 174-181.
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