The treatment of patients with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus by primary care physicians

David Marrero, Patricia S. Moore, Naomi S. Fineberg, Carl D. Langefeld, Charles M. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extent to which a sample of community based, primary care physicians follow current standards of care for the treatment of non-obese, insulin-requiring patients as defined and recently published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) was studied. A total of 212 physicians responded with 191 indicating that they treat one or more non-obese, insulin-requiring patients. Of this sample, 97% used multiple injection, mixed insulin regimens. However, over 70% also used single injection regimens. Whereas 94% prescribed self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG), only 31% did so for more than 75% of their patients and 37% did so for less than 50%. Twenty-five percent of respondents did not obtain HbA1 values on their patients. For respondents who do collect HbA1, only 28% did so for over 75% of their patients and 30% for less than 50%. Physicians with fewer patients were more likely to prescribe single injection insulin regimens (P=.02). Recent graduates from medical school also used HbAl's more frequently than earlier graduates (p=.001). These data suggest that while care practices recommended by the ADA are being implemented by primary care physicians, they are significantly under-utilized.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-267
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1991

Fingerprint

Primary Care Physicians
chronic illness
Diabetes Mellitus
physician
Insulin
graduate
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Injections
Therapeutics
Biphasic Insulins
Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Physicians
Standard of Care
monitoring
Medical Schools
school
community
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The treatment of patients with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus by primary care physicians. / Marrero, David; Moore, Patricia S.; Fineberg, Naomi S.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Clark, Charles M.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 16, No. 5, 10.1991, p. 259-267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marrero, David ; Moore, Patricia S. ; Fineberg, Naomi S. ; Langefeld, Carl D. ; Clark, Charles M. / The treatment of patients with insulin-requiring diabetes mellitus by primary care physicians. In: Journal of Community Health. 1991 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 259-267.
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