The use of a biodegradable, load-bearing scaffold as a carrier for antibiotics in an infected open fracture model

Rena L. Stewart, Joseph T. Cox, David Volgas, James Stannard, Lynn Duffy, Ken B. Waites, T.M. Gabriel Chu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Open fractures with bone loss are common, disabling injuries. Biodegradable, load-bearing scaffolds able to carry high concentrations of local antibiotics are an emerging technology to address these injuries. This study investigates the use of such scaffolds with gentamicin (along with bone morphogenetic protein) in an infected rat open fracture model to decrease osteomyelitis and promote fracture healing. Methods: A contaminated open fracture was created in 32 Brown Norway rats. A comminuted femoral fracture was created, followed by crushing, and the 5-mm bone defect was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (10 colony-forming units/mL) and Escherichia coli (10 colony-forming units/mL). The scaffold was stabilized in the defect with an intramedullary Kirschner wire. Gentamicin was loaded onto the scaffolds at two doses, either 10 mg (n = 12) or 20 mg (n = 10). Controls (n = 10) received no antibiotics. All three groups had 10 μg bone morphogenetic protein loaded on the scaffold. Serial radiographs were obtained. Microbiologic analysis, microcomputed tomography, and histology were performed. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the radiographic evidence of osteomyelitis (P = 0.004) and callus formation (P = 0.021) between the treated and control groups. Bone culture analysis results were not significant for S. aureus (P = 0.29) or E. coli (P = 0.25). There was no difference in the mean scaffold volume or density of the three treatment groups. Conclusions: Our results suggest that gentamicin applied to a biodegradable scaffold is effective at decreasing radiographically defined osteomyelitis in an infected open fracture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-591
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Open Fractures
Weight-Bearing
Osteomyelitis
Gentamicins
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bone Morphogenetic Proteins
Bone and Bones
Staphylococcus aureus
Stem Cells
Escherichia coli
Comminuted Fractures
Bone Wires
X-Ray Microtomography
Fracture Healing
Femoral Fractures
Wounds and Injuries
Bony Callus
Histology
Technology
Control Groups

Keywords

  • biodegradable scaffold
  • local antibiotics
  • open fracture
  • osteomyelitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The use of a biodegradable, load-bearing scaffold as a carrier for antibiotics in an infected open fracture model. / Stewart, Rena L.; Cox, Joseph T.; Volgas, David; Stannard, James; Duffy, Lynn; Waites, Ken B.; Chu, T.M. Gabriel.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 24, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 587-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stewart, Rena L. ; Cox, Joseph T. ; Volgas, David ; Stannard, James ; Duffy, Lynn ; Waites, Ken B. ; Chu, T.M. Gabriel. / The use of a biodegradable, load-bearing scaffold as a carrier for antibiotics in an infected open fracture model. In: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 587-591.
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