The use of computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children does not influence the overall rate of negative appendectomy or perforation

M. J. Weyant, S. R. Eachempati, M. A. Maluccio, N. Spigland, L. J. Hydo, P. S. Barie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Computed tomography (CT) has been used more frequently to diagnose acute appendicitis in children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of CT has any influence on negative appendectomy or perforation rates. Methods: Review of a prospective database of children having appendectomy for suspected acute appendicitis. Negative appendectomy and perforation rates were determined by correlation with final pathology reports. Results: Eighty-five consecutive patients underwent appendectomy for the suspicion of acute appendicitis. The overall negative appendectomy rate was 17.6%, being 19.4% in females and 16.6% in males (p = 0.75). The overall accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictive value of CT were 75%, 91%, and 81%, respectively. Patients that had CT did not have a significantly lower rate of negative appendectomy (17.9% vs. 19.3%, p > 0.99) or perforation (26% vs. 17%; p = 0.53). Conclusions: The use of CT for the diagnosis of appendicitis in children does not change the negative appendectomy rate. Results of studies performed in adults may not be extrapolated to the evaluation of children with suspected acute appendicitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-23
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Infections
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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