Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality: Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD)

Dori Bilik, Laura N. McEwen, Morton B. Brown, Joe V. Selby, Andrew J. Karter, David Marrero, Victoria C. Hsiao, Chien Wen Tseng, Carol M. Mangione, Norman L. Lasser, Jesse C. Crosson, William H. Herman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Studies have associated thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and questioned whether the two available TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have different CVD risks. We compared CVD incidence, cardiovascular (CV), and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone or pioglitazone as their only TZD. Methods: We analyzed survey, medical record, administrative, and National Death Index (NDI) data from 1999 through 2003 from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Medications, CV procedures, and CVD were determined from health plan (HP) administrative data, and mortality was from NDI. Adjusted hazard rates (AHR) were derived from Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, history of diabetic nephropathy, history of CVD, insulin use, and HP. Results: Across TRIAD's 10 HPs, 1,815 patients (24%) filled prescriptions for a TZD, 773 (10%) for only rosiglitazone, 711 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 331 (4%) for multiple TZDs. In the seven HPs using both TZDs, 1,159 patients (33%) filled a prescription for a TZD, 564 (16%) for only rosiglitazone, 334 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 261 (7%) for multiple TZDs. For all CV events, CV, and all-cause mortality, we found no significant difference between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. Conclusions: In this relatively small, prospective, observational study, we found no statistically significant differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- compared to pioglitazone-treated patients. There does not appear to be a pattern of clinically meaningful differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- versus pioglitazone-treated patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-721
Number of pages7
JournalPharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

rosiglitazone
pioglitazone
Thiazolidinediones
Cardiovascular Diseases
Mortality
Research
Observational Studies
Prescriptions
Prospective Studies
Health
Diabetic Nephropathies
Managed Care Programs
Proportional Hazards Models
Medical Records

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Pioglitazone
  • Rosiglitazone
  • Thiazolidinediones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality : Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD). / Bilik, Dori; McEwen, Laura N.; Brown, Morton B.; Selby, Joe V.; Karter, Andrew J.; Marrero, David; Hsiao, Victoria C.; Tseng, Chien Wen; Mangione, Carol M.; Lasser, Norman L.; Crosson, Jesse C.; Herman, William H.

In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Vol. 19, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 715-721.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bilik, D, McEwen, LN, Brown, MB, Selby, JV, Karter, AJ, Marrero, D, Hsiao, VC, Tseng, CW, Mangione, CM, Lasser, NL, Crosson, JC & Herman, WH 2010, 'Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality: Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD)', Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 715-721. https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.1954
Bilik, Dori ; McEwen, Laura N. ; Brown, Morton B. ; Selby, Joe V. ; Karter, Andrew J. ; Marrero, David ; Hsiao, Victoria C. ; Tseng, Chien Wen ; Mangione, Carol M. ; Lasser, Norman L. ; Crosson, Jesse C. ; Herman, William H. / Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality : Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD). In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 7. pp. 715-721.
@article{0c6209f3765841ae9161a84bf02249a5,
title = "Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality: Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD)",
abstract = "Background: Studies have associated thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and questioned whether the two available TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have different CVD risks. We compared CVD incidence, cardiovascular (CV), and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone or pioglitazone as their only TZD. Methods: We analyzed survey, medical record, administrative, and National Death Index (NDI) data from 1999 through 2003 from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Medications, CV procedures, and CVD were determined from health plan (HP) administrative data, and mortality was from NDI. Adjusted hazard rates (AHR) were derived from Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, history of diabetic nephropathy, history of CVD, insulin use, and HP. Results: Across TRIAD's 10 HPs, 1,815 patients (24{\%}) filled prescriptions for a TZD, 773 (10{\%}) for only rosiglitazone, 711 (10{\%}) for only pioglitazone, and 331 (4{\%}) for multiple TZDs. In the seven HPs using both TZDs, 1,159 patients (33{\%}) filled a prescription for a TZD, 564 (16{\%}) for only rosiglitazone, 334 (10{\%}) for only pioglitazone, and 261 (7{\%}) for multiple TZDs. For all CV events, CV, and all-cause mortality, we found no significant difference between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. Conclusions: In this relatively small, prospective, observational study, we found no statistically significant differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- compared to pioglitazone-treated patients. There does not appear to be a pattern of clinically meaningful differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- versus pioglitazone-treated patients.",
keywords = "Diabetes, Pioglitazone, Rosiglitazone, Thiazolidinediones",
author = "Dori Bilik and McEwen, {Laura N.} and Brown, {Morton B.} and Selby, {Joe V.} and Karter, {Andrew J.} and David Marrero and Hsiao, {Victoria C.} and Tseng, {Chien Wen} and Mangione, {Carol M.} and Lasser, {Norman L.} and Crosson, {Jesse C.} and Herman, {William H.}",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1002/pds.1954",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "715--721",
journal = "Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety",
issn = "1053-8569",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thiazolidinediones, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular mortality

T2 - Translating research into action for diabetes (TRIAD)

AU - Bilik, Dori

AU - McEwen, Laura N.

AU - Brown, Morton B.

AU - Selby, Joe V.

AU - Karter, Andrew J.

AU - Marrero, David

AU - Hsiao, Victoria C.

AU - Tseng, Chien Wen

AU - Mangione, Carol M.

AU - Lasser, Norman L.

AU - Crosson, Jesse C.

AU - Herman, William H.

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Background: Studies have associated thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and questioned whether the two available TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have different CVD risks. We compared CVD incidence, cardiovascular (CV), and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone or pioglitazone as their only TZD. Methods: We analyzed survey, medical record, administrative, and National Death Index (NDI) data from 1999 through 2003 from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Medications, CV procedures, and CVD were determined from health plan (HP) administrative data, and mortality was from NDI. Adjusted hazard rates (AHR) were derived from Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, history of diabetic nephropathy, history of CVD, insulin use, and HP. Results: Across TRIAD's 10 HPs, 1,815 patients (24%) filled prescriptions for a TZD, 773 (10%) for only rosiglitazone, 711 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 331 (4%) for multiple TZDs. In the seven HPs using both TZDs, 1,159 patients (33%) filled a prescription for a TZD, 564 (16%) for only rosiglitazone, 334 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 261 (7%) for multiple TZDs. For all CV events, CV, and all-cause mortality, we found no significant difference between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. Conclusions: In this relatively small, prospective, observational study, we found no statistically significant differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- compared to pioglitazone-treated patients. There does not appear to be a pattern of clinically meaningful differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- versus pioglitazone-treated patients.

AB - Background: Studies have associated thiazolidinedione (TZD) treatment with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and questioned whether the two available TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, have different CVD risks. We compared CVD incidence, cardiovascular (CV), and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone or pioglitazone as their only TZD. Methods: We analyzed survey, medical record, administrative, and National Death Index (NDI) data from 1999 through 2003 from Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD), a prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Medications, CV procedures, and CVD were determined from health plan (HP) administrative data, and mortality was from NDI. Adjusted hazard rates (AHR) were derived from Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, income, history of diabetic nephropathy, history of CVD, insulin use, and HP. Results: Across TRIAD's 10 HPs, 1,815 patients (24%) filled prescriptions for a TZD, 773 (10%) for only rosiglitazone, 711 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 331 (4%) for multiple TZDs. In the seven HPs using both TZDs, 1,159 patients (33%) filled a prescription for a TZD, 564 (16%) for only rosiglitazone, 334 (10%) for only pioglitazone, and 261 (7%) for multiple TZDs. For all CV events, CV, and all-cause mortality, we found no significant difference between rosiglitazone and pioglitazone. Conclusions: In this relatively small, prospective, observational study, we found no statistically significant differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- compared to pioglitazone-treated patients. There does not appear to be a pattern of clinically meaningful differences in CV outcomes for rosiglitazone- versus pioglitazone-treated patients.

KW - Diabetes

KW - Pioglitazone

KW - Rosiglitazone

KW - Thiazolidinediones

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955609161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955609161&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/pds.1954

DO - 10.1002/pds.1954

M3 - Article

C2 - 20583206

AN - SCOPUS:77955609161

VL - 19

SP - 715

EP - 721

JO - Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety

JF - Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety

SN - 1053-8569

IS - 7

ER -