Three dimensional analysis of microaneurysms in the human diabetic retina

J. Moore, S. Bagley, G. Ireland, D. McLeod, M. E. Boulton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The retinal vasculature of postmortem normal human and diabetic eyes was studied using an immunohistochemical technique in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The technique, which stained for von Willebrand factor, allowed both large areas of the retinal vasculature to be visualised and abnormalities to be studied in detail without disturbing the tissue architecture. Only one microaneurysm, defined as any focal capillary dilation, was observed in 10 normal eyes but numerous microaneurysms were seen in 4 out of 5 diabetic retinas; counts varied between 0 and 26 per 0.41 mm2 sample area. Microaneurysms were classified into 3 categories according to morphology: saccular, fusiform and focal bulges. Most were saccular, these having no preferred orientation. The majority of microaneurysms were associated with just 2 vessels suggesting they were unlikely to develop at vascular junctions. The majority were observed to originate from the inner nuclear layer and were therefore in the deeper part of the inner retinal capillary plexus. Variation in the staining of microaneurysms may correlate with endothelial dysfunction seen clinically as dye leakage during fluorescein angiography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-100
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Anatomy
Volume194
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

retina
Retina
eyes
blood coagulation factors
dilation
plexus
confocal laser scanning microscopy
preferred orientation
fluorescein
abnormality
blood vessels
leakage
dyes
microscopy
dye
vessel
laser
methodology
Fluorescein Angiography
von Willebrand Factor

Keywords

  • Confocal microscopy
  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Retinal vasculature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Moore, J., Bagley, S., Ireland, G., McLeod, D., & Boulton, M. E. (1999). Three dimensional analysis of microaneurysms in the human diabetic retina. Journal of Anatomy, 194(1), 89-100. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021878298004403

Three dimensional analysis of microaneurysms in the human diabetic retina. / Moore, J.; Bagley, S.; Ireland, G.; McLeod, D.; Boulton, M. E.

In: Journal of Anatomy, Vol. 194, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 89-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, J, Bagley, S, Ireland, G, McLeod, D & Boulton, ME 1999, 'Three dimensional analysis of microaneurysms in the human diabetic retina', Journal of Anatomy, vol. 194, no. 1, pp. 89-100. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021878298004403
Moore, J. ; Bagley, S. ; Ireland, G. ; McLeod, D. ; Boulton, M. E. / Three dimensional analysis of microaneurysms in the human diabetic retina. In: Journal of Anatomy. 1999 ; Vol. 194, No. 1. pp. 89-100.
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