Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer

Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment

G. Paul Wright, Jan H. Wong, John W. Morgan, Sharmila Roy-Chowdhury, Kevork Kazanjian, Sharon S. Lum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No clear guidelines exist defining the appropriate time frame from diagnosis to definitive surgical treatment of breast cancer. Studies have suggested that treatment delays greater than 90 days may be associated with stage migration. We sought to evaluate demographic factors that influence 30-day and 90-day benchmarks for time from diagnosis to definitive surgical treatment of breast cancer. Between 2004 and 2007, 19,896 women with stage I to III invasive breast cancer were treated with primary surgical therapy and did not receive preoperative systemic therapy in the California Cancer Registry. Overall, 75.7 per cent of patients were treated within 30 days of diagnosis, and 95.5 per cent of patients were treated within 90 days of diagnosis. Multivariate analyses revealed that treatment delays were associated with smaller tumor size, use of total mastectomy, lower socioeconomic status, and Hispanic and nonHispanic black race/ethnicity. Furthermore, disparities in those that did not meet 30-day benchmark timeframes were exaggerated with 90-day treatment delays. These benchmarks can be used to measure disparities in health care delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1122
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume76
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Benchmarking
Therapeutics
Simple Mastectomy
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
Registries
Neoplasms
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Wright, G. P., Wong, J. H., Morgan, J. W., Roy-Chowdhury, S., Kazanjian, K., & Lum, S. S. (2010). Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer: Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment. American Surgeon, 76(10), 1119-1122.

Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer : Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment. / Wright, G. Paul; Wong, Jan H.; Morgan, John W.; Roy-Chowdhury, Sharmila; Kazanjian, Kevork; Lum, Sharon S.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 76, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 1119-1122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wright, GP, Wong, JH, Morgan, JW, Roy-Chowdhury, S, Kazanjian, K & Lum, SS 2010, 'Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer: Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment', American Surgeon, vol. 76, no. 10, pp. 1119-1122.
Wright GP, Wong JH, Morgan JW, Roy-Chowdhury S, Kazanjian K, Lum SS. Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer: Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment. American Surgeon. 2010 Oct;76(10):1119-1122.
Wright, G. Paul ; Wong, Jan H. ; Morgan, John W. ; Roy-Chowdhury, Sharmila ; Kazanjian, Kevork ; Lum, Sharon S. / Time from diagnosis to surgical treatment of breast cancer : Factors influencing delays in initiating treatment. In: American Surgeon. 2010 ; Vol. 76, No. 10. pp. 1119-1122.
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