Time from first intercourse to first sexually transmitted infection diagnosis among adolescent women

Wanzhu Tu, Byron Batteiger, Sarah Wiehe, Susan Ofner, Barbara Van Der Pol, Barry Katz, Donald P. Orr, J. Fortenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the time between first intercourse and first sexually transmitted infection (STI) with. Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, or Trichomonas vaginalis and time between repeated infections. Design: Observational study. Setting: Three adolescent medicine clinics. Participants: A cohort of 386 urban young women aged 14 to 17 years at enrollment. Main Outcome Measures: Age at first intercourse; organism-specific interval between first intercourse and first STI diagnosis; interval between repeated infections; and age at first STI test prior to study participation. Results: Participants had first intercourse at a young age (first, second, and third quartiles were 13, 14, and 15 years of age, respectively). By age 15 years, 25% of the women acquired their first STI, most often C trachomatis. Median interval between first intercourse and first STI diagnosis was 2 years. Within 1 year of first intercourse, 25% had their first C trachomatis infection. Repeated infections were common; within 3.6, 6, and 4.8 months, 25% of the women with prior C trachomatis, N gonorrhoeae, and T vaginalis infection were reinfected with the respective organisms. Considerable delay in STI testing was found for those who began sex at a younger age. The median interval between first sex and first test were 4.9, 3.5, 2.1, 1.8, and 1.2 years for those who had first sex at ages 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 years, respectively. Conclusions: Timely screening and treatment are important for prevention of STI sequelae. For urban adolescent women, STI screening (especially for C trachomatis) should begin within a year after first intercourse and infected individuals should be retested every 3 to 4 months.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1106-1111
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume163
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009

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Coitus
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Infection
Adolescent Medicine
Trichomonas vaginalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Gonorrhea
Chlamydia trachomatis
Observational Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Time from first intercourse to first sexually transmitted infection diagnosis among adolescent women. / Tu, Wanzhu; Batteiger, Byron; Wiehe, Sarah; Ofner, Susan; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Katz, Barry; Orr, Donald P.; Fortenberry, J.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 163, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 1106-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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