Time spent outside of target glucose range for young children with type 1 diabetes: a continuous glucose monitor study

L. A. DiMeglio, L. G. Kanapka, D. J. DeSalvo, B. J. Anderson, K. R. Harrington, M. E. Hilliard, L. M. Laffel, W. V. Tamborlane, M. A. Van Name, R. P. Wadwa, S. M. Willi, S. Woerner, J. C. Wong, K. M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To assess the associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and sensor glucose metrics in young children with type 1 diabetes, using masked, continuous glucose monitoring data from children aged 2 to < 8 years. Research design and methods: The analysis included 143 children across 14 sites in the USA, enrolled in a separate clinical trial. Eligibility criteria were: age 2 to <8 years; type 1 diabetes duration ≥3 months; no continuous glucose monitoring use for past 30 days; and HbA1c concentration 53 to <86 mmol/mol (7.0 to <10.0%). All participants wore masked continuous glucose monitors up to 14 days. Results: On average, participants spent the majority (13 h) of the day in hyperglycaemia (>10.0 mmol/l) and a median of ~1 h/day in hypoglycaemia (<3.9 mmol/l). Participants with minority race/ethnicity and higher parent education levels spent more time in target range, 3.9–10.0 mmol/l, and less time in hyperglycaemia. More time in hypoglycaemia was associated with minority race/ethnicity and younger age at diagnosis. Continuous glucose monitoring metrics were similar in pump and injection users. Conclusions: Given that both hypo- and hyperglycaemia negatively impact neurocognitive development, strategies to increase time in target glucose range for young children are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1308-1315
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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    DiMeglio, L. A., Kanapka, L. G., DeSalvo, D. J., Anderson, B. J., Harrington, K. R., Hilliard, M. E., Laffel, L. M., Tamborlane, W. V., Van Name, M. A., Wadwa, R. P., Willi, S. M., Woerner, S., Wong, J. C., & Miller, K. M. (2020). Time spent outside of target glucose range for young children with type 1 diabetes: a continuous glucose monitor study. Diabetic Medicine, 37(8), 1308-1315. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.14276