Tissue vaccines for cancer

Mark A. Suckow, Julie Heinrich, Elliot Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most tumors, including prostate carcinoma, are heterogeneous mixtures of neoplastic cells and supporting stromal matrix. Attempts to vaccinate as a means to treat or prevent cancer have typically relied on use of a single antigen or cell type. In the case of wholecell vaccines, clonal populations of cancer cells are grown in culture and harvested for vaccine material. However, it is clear from microarray data that neoplastic cells grown in culture are greatly different from those found in vivo. Tissue vaccines are harvested directly from tumors and are used to immunize the animal or the patient. They are antigenically rich, in that they are comprised of not only neoplastic cells but also supporting stromal matrix; furthermore, they include antigens that may be expressed only in vivo and which may be critical to a successful immune response to the cancer. For these reasons, the idea that tissue vaccines for cancer have potentially great utility has merit and should be explored further.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)925-937
Number of pages13
JournalExpert Review of Vaccines
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Fingerprint

Cancer Vaccines
Vaccines
Neoplasms
Antigens
Stromal Cells
Prostate
Carcinoma
Population

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Lobund-Wistar rat
  • Prostate cancer
  • Tissue vaccine
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Tissue vaccines for cancer. / Suckow, Mark A.; Heinrich, Julie; Rosen, Elliot.

In: Expert Review of Vaccines, Vol. 6, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 925-937.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suckow, Mark A. ; Heinrich, Julie ; Rosen, Elliot. / Tissue vaccines for cancer. In: Expert Review of Vaccines. 2007 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 925-937.
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