TLR9 polymorphisms are associated with altered IFN-γ levels in children with cerebral malaria

Nadia A. Sam-Agudu, Jennifer A. Greene, Robert O. Opoka, James W. Kazura, Michael J. Boivin, Peter A. Zimmerman, Melissa A. Riedesel, Tracy L. Bergemann, Lisa A. Schimmenti, Chandy John

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms have been associated with disease severity in malaria infection, but mechanisms for this association have not been characterized. The TLR2, 4, and 9 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) frequencies and serum interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were assessed in Ugandan children with cerebral malaria (CM, N = 65) and uncomplicated malaria (UM, N = 52). The TLR9 C allele at -1237 and G allele at 1174 were strongly linked, and among children with CM, those with the C allele at -1237 or the G allele at 1174 had higher levels of IFN-γ than those without these alleles (P = 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). The TLR9 SNPs were not associated with altered IFN-γ levels in children with UM or altered TNF-α levels in either group. We present the first human data that TLR SNPs are associated with altered cytokine production in parasitic infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-555
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume82
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Cerebral Malaria
Interferons
Alleles
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Toll-Like Receptors
Malaria
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Parasitic Diseases
Cytokines
Infection
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

TLR9 polymorphisms are associated with altered IFN-γ levels in children with cerebral malaria. / Sam-Agudu, Nadia A.; Greene, Jennifer A.; Opoka, Robert O.; Kazura, James W.; Boivin, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Riedesel, Melissa A.; Bergemann, Tracy L.; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; John, Chandy.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 82, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 548-555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sam-Agudu, NA, Greene, JA, Opoka, RO, Kazura, JW, Boivin, MJ, Zimmerman, PA, Riedesel, MA, Bergemann, TL, Schimmenti, LA & John, C 2010, 'TLR9 polymorphisms are associated with altered IFN-γ levels in children with cerebral malaria', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 82, no. 4, pp. 548-555. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0467
Sam-Agudu, Nadia A. ; Greene, Jennifer A. ; Opoka, Robert O. ; Kazura, James W. ; Boivin, Michael J. ; Zimmerman, Peter A. ; Riedesel, Melissa A. ; Bergemann, Tracy L. ; Schimmenti, Lisa A. ; John, Chandy. / TLR9 polymorphisms are associated with altered IFN-γ levels in children with cerebral malaria. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 4. pp. 548-555.
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