Tobacco use and cessation among veterans recovering from stroke or TIA: A qualitative assessment and implications for rehabilitation

Alan Zillich, Karen Hudmon, Teresa Damush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To understand factors associated with tobacco use and related tobacco cessation among veterans recovering from stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) that will faciltate design of a tailored intervention for rehabilitation services.Methods: Four focus groups were conducted with veterans who were smokers prior to an incident stroke or TIA along with their spouse or caregiver. Focus groups addressed tobacco use, cessation, and barriers to quitting during the recovery and maintenance periods. Focus group discussions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using an inductive qualitative method.Results: Twenty-eight veterans and spouses/caregivers participated. Five themes emerged from analysis: existing helpful resources for cessation, existing unhelpful resources, barriers and facilitators to cessation, desired resources for quitting, and association of stroke/TIA with tobacco use. Pharmacotherapy and support from medical providers were perceived as helpful whereas group programs and flyers were perceived as unhelpful. Barriers to quitting included boredom and lack of social support; facilitators included social support and the cost of tobacco products. Vocational and rehabilitation programs were highly desirable resources for quitting. Participants did not perceive their stroke/TIA to be associated with tobacco use.Conclusion: Results identified several issues concerning tobacco use and cessation relevant to patients recovering from stroke/TIA. These results can inform the development of a tailored cessation intervention for integration into rehabilitation and recovery treatment plans for patients with stroke/TIA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-149
Number of pages10
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Transient Ischemic Attack
Veterans
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Tobacco Use
Focus Groups
Social Support
Caregivers
Boredom
Vocational Rehabilitation
Tobacco Products
Maintenance
Costs and Cost Analysis
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Focus group
  • Qualitative
  • Smoking cessation
  • Stroke
  • Tobacco
  • Tobacco cessation
  • Tobacco use
  • Transient ischemic attack
  • Veteran

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

Tobacco use and cessation among veterans recovering from stroke or TIA : A qualitative assessment and implications for rehabilitation. / Zillich, Alan; Hudmon, Karen; Damush, Teresa.

In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.01.2010, p. 140-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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