Toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load

Effect on the development of simulated non-carious cervical lesions

Cecilia P. Turssi, Adam B. Kelly, Anderson Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated the effect of toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load on the development of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Methods: Human premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and had their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm length area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed for brushing. The teeth were brushed under 1- or 3 N load with one of the following toothbrushes (n = 16): a) ordinary/flat-trimmed (Oral-B Indicator); b) rippled (Oral-B Contour); c) cross-angled/multileveled/rubber bristles (Oral-B Pro-Health All-in-One); d) cross-angled/multileveled/flex head (Oral-B Pro-Flex); e) feathered (Oral-B Compact Clean). Brushing was performed using toothpaste slurry (Crest Cavity Protection) for 55,000 double-strokes in back-and-forth motion, to simulate 10 years of brushing. Impressions were taken at baseline and after brushing and scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. The lesions formed were evaluated for volume loss, angle, and shape. Results: The ordinary/flat-trimmed toothbrush caused significantly higher volume loss (3.81 mm3) in comparison to the other toothbrushes (2.56-2.92 mm3). The toothbrush having rubber bristles was associated with NCCLs showing the smallest angle and, along with the rippled toothbrush (53.1%), provoked higher proportion of wedge-shaped lesions (43.8%), whereas teeth brushed with the feathered toothbrush exhibited the lowest prevalence of wedge-shaped lesions (3.1%). The 1- and 3 N load applied during brushing affected neither volume loss nor lesion angle. Conclusions: At the brushing loads tested, the development of NCCLs was dependent on toothbrush bristle configuration, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version causing the highest abrasion and the feathered toothbrush the least proportion of wedge-shaped lesions. Clinical significance: Toothbrush bristle arrangement plays a role in NCCL development, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version being more abrasive and the feathered toothbrush causing less wedge-shaped lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Dentistry
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rubber
Tooth
Toothpastes
Acrylic Resins
Bicuspid
Gingiva
Dental Enamel
Stroke
Head
Health

Keywords

  • Brushing load
  • Non-carious cervical lesion
  • Profilometry
  • Toothbrush

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load : Effect on the development of simulated non-carious cervical lesions. / Turssi, Cecilia P.; Kelly, Adam B.; Hara, Anderson.

In: Journal of Dentistry, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load: Effect on the development of simulated non-carious cervical lesions",
abstract = "Objectives: This study investigated the effect of toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load on the development of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Methods: Human premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and had their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm length area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed for brushing. The teeth were brushed under 1- or 3 N load with one of the following toothbrushes (n = 16): a) ordinary/flat-trimmed (Oral-B Indicator); b) rippled (Oral-B Contour); c) cross-angled/multileveled/rubber bristles (Oral-B Pro-Health All-in-One); d) cross-angled/multileveled/flex head (Oral-B Pro-Flex); e) feathered (Oral-B Compact Clean). Brushing was performed using toothpaste slurry (Crest Cavity Protection) for 55,000 double-strokes in back-and-forth motion, to simulate 10 years of brushing. Impressions were taken at baseline and after brushing and scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. The lesions formed were evaluated for volume loss, angle, and shape. Results: The ordinary/flat-trimmed toothbrush caused significantly higher volume loss (3.81 mm3) in comparison to the other toothbrushes (2.56-2.92 mm3). The toothbrush having rubber bristles was associated with NCCLs showing the smallest angle and, along with the rippled toothbrush (53.1{\%}), provoked higher proportion of wedge-shaped lesions (43.8{\%}), whereas teeth brushed with the feathered toothbrush exhibited the lowest prevalence of wedge-shaped lesions (3.1{\%}). The 1- and 3 N load applied during brushing affected neither volume loss nor lesion angle. Conclusions: At the brushing loads tested, the development of NCCLs was dependent on toothbrush bristle configuration, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version causing the highest abrasion and the feathered toothbrush the least proportion of wedge-shaped lesions. Clinical significance: Toothbrush bristle arrangement plays a role in NCCL development, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version being more abrasive and the feathered toothbrush causing less wedge-shaped lesions.",
keywords = "Brushing load, Non-carious cervical lesion, Profilometry, Toothbrush",
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Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objectives: This study investigated the effect of toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load on the development of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Methods: Human premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and had their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm length area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed for brushing. The teeth were brushed under 1- or 3 N load with one of the following toothbrushes (n = 16): a) ordinary/flat-trimmed (Oral-B Indicator); b) rippled (Oral-B Contour); c) cross-angled/multileveled/rubber bristles (Oral-B Pro-Health All-in-One); d) cross-angled/multileveled/flex head (Oral-B Pro-Flex); e) feathered (Oral-B Compact Clean). Brushing was performed using toothpaste slurry (Crest Cavity Protection) for 55,000 double-strokes in back-and-forth motion, to simulate 10 years of brushing. Impressions were taken at baseline and after brushing and scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. The lesions formed were evaluated for volume loss, angle, and shape. Results: The ordinary/flat-trimmed toothbrush caused significantly higher volume loss (3.81 mm3) in comparison to the other toothbrushes (2.56-2.92 mm3). The toothbrush having rubber bristles was associated with NCCLs showing the smallest angle and, along with the rippled toothbrush (53.1%), provoked higher proportion of wedge-shaped lesions (43.8%), whereas teeth brushed with the feathered toothbrush exhibited the lowest prevalence of wedge-shaped lesions (3.1%). The 1- and 3 N load applied during brushing affected neither volume loss nor lesion angle. Conclusions: At the brushing loads tested, the development of NCCLs was dependent on toothbrush bristle configuration, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version causing the highest abrasion and the feathered toothbrush the least proportion of wedge-shaped lesions. Clinical significance: Toothbrush bristle arrangement plays a role in NCCL development, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version being more abrasive and the feathered toothbrush causing less wedge-shaped lesions.

AB - Objectives: This study investigated the effect of toothbrush bristle configuration and brushing load on the development of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). Methods: Human premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and had their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm length area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed for brushing. The teeth were brushed under 1- or 3 N load with one of the following toothbrushes (n = 16): a) ordinary/flat-trimmed (Oral-B Indicator); b) rippled (Oral-B Contour); c) cross-angled/multileveled/rubber bristles (Oral-B Pro-Health All-in-One); d) cross-angled/multileveled/flex head (Oral-B Pro-Flex); e) feathered (Oral-B Compact Clean). Brushing was performed using toothpaste slurry (Crest Cavity Protection) for 55,000 double-strokes in back-and-forth motion, to simulate 10 years of brushing. Impressions were taken at baseline and after brushing and scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. The lesions formed were evaluated for volume loss, angle, and shape. Results: The ordinary/flat-trimmed toothbrush caused significantly higher volume loss (3.81 mm3) in comparison to the other toothbrushes (2.56-2.92 mm3). The toothbrush having rubber bristles was associated with NCCLs showing the smallest angle and, along with the rippled toothbrush (53.1%), provoked higher proportion of wedge-shaped lesions (43.8%), whereas teeth brushed with the feathered toothbrush exhibited the lowest prevalence of wedge-shaped lesions (3.1%). The 1- and 3 N load applied during brushing affected neither volume loss nor lesion angle. Conclusions: At the brushing loads tested, the development of NCCLs was dependent on toothbrush bristle configuration, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version causing the highest abrasion and the feathered toothbrush the least proportion of wedge-shaped lesions. Clinical significance: Toothbrush bristle arrangement plays a role in NCCL development, with the ordinary/flat-trimmed version being more abrasive and the feathered toothbrush causing less wedge-shaped lesions.

KW - Brushing load

KW - Non-carious cervical lesion

KW - Profilometry

KW - Toothbrush

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