Topical application of a vitamin D analogue exacerbates atopic dermatitis and induces the atopic dermatitis-like phenotype in stat6VT mice

Matthew J. Turner, Sonia C. Dasilva-Arnold, Qiaofang Yi, Purvi Mehrotra, Mark H. Kaplan, Jeffrey B. Travers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Calcipotriene is a topical vitamin D3 analogue approved for the treatment of plaque and scalp psoriasis. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy whose atopic dermatitis (AD) flared in response to application of calcipotriene 0.005% cream and solution for a mistaken diagnosis of plaque and scalp psoriasis. We investigated whether the patient's eruption was secondary to an allergic contact dermatitis. In the Stat6VT mouse model of AD we tested whether calcipotriene could induce the otherwise-spontaneous AD-like phenotype. Closed patch testing was done on the patient with calcipotriene solution and cream, moisturizing cream, and 51% isopropanol. Stat6VT and wild-type (WT) mice were treated for 7 days with calcipotriene solution or vehicle (isopropanol) applied to the right and left upper back skin, respectively, after which mice were followed longitudinally for 10 weeks. Biopsy specimens from prior treatment sites were then collected for histology and RNA isolation. RNA was analyzed for interleukin (IL-4) expression using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patch testing was negative. Stat6VT mice, in contrast to WT mice, developed a persistent eczematous dermatitis at sites of calcipotriene application. Clinical and histologic features and high IL-4 transcript levels were consistent with the spontaneous AD-like phenotype seen in Stat6VT mice. At sites of active disease, calcipotriene can worsen a flare of AD. In Stat6VT mice, calcipotriene can induce the AD-like phenotype.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-578
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Topical application of a vitamin D analogue exacerbates atopic dermatitis and induces the atopic dermatitis-like phenotype in stat6VT mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this