Traditional immune-modulating drugs

Stephen Wolverton, Mouhammad Aouthmany

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The subject of traditional immune modulating drugs is potentially vast. However, only a small number of these drugs are commonly used by dermatologists. This chapter addresses the key mechanisms of how the majority of inflammatory skin diseases are treated, and discusses six systemic drugs from four drugs groups: (1) calcineurin inhibitors: cyclosporine; (2) antimetabolites/purine analogues: azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil; (3) antimetabolites/folate antagonists: methotrexate and dapsone; (4) alkylating agents: cyclophosphamide; and (5) lysosomotropic agents: hydroxychloroquine. This classification scheme is a reasonable way to categorize the drugs, although it should be noted that several of these drugs have additional mechanisms of action that differ from the above categories. Furthermore, it is not realistic to discuss all available immune-modulating drugs; several notable drug groups not covered in this chapter include retinoids and interferons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationClinical and Basic Immunodermatology
Subtitle of host publicationSecond Edition
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages803-814
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9783319297859
ISBN (Print)9783319297835
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 24 2017

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Preparations
Antimetabolites
Mycophenolic Acid
Hydroxychloroquine
Dapsone
Alkylating Agents
Retinoids
Azathioprine
Folic Acid
Skin Diseases
Methotrexate
Cyclophosphamide
Interferons
Cyclosporine

Keywords

  • Alkylating agent
  • Alkylating agents
  • Antimetabolites
  • Atopic dermatitis
  • Azathioprine Mechanisms
  • Calcineurin inhibitors
  • Cyclophosphamide
  • Cyclosporine
  • Immune-Modulating Drugs
  • Methotrexate
  • Psoriasis
  • Systemic calcineurin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Wolverton, S., & Aouthmany, M. (2017). Traditional immune-modulating drugs. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition (pp. 803-814). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_47

Traditional immune-modulating drugs. / Wolverton, Stephen; Aouthmany, Mouhammad.

Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. p. 803-814.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wolverton, S & Aouthmany, M 2017, Traditional immune-modulating drugs. in Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, pp. 803-814. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_47
Wolverton S, Aouthmany M. Traditional immune-modulating drugs. In Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing. 2017. p. 803-814 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29785-9_47
Wolverton, Stephen ; Aouthmany, Mouhammad. / Traditional immune-modulating drugs. Clinical and Basic Immunodermatology: Second Edition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. pp. 803-814
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