Traditions and Alcohol Use

A Mixed-Methods Analysis

Felipe González Castro, Kathryn Coe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An integrative mixed-methods analysis examined traditional beliefs as associated with beliefs about self-care during pregnancy and with alcohol abstinence among young adult women from two rural U.S.-Mexico border communities. Quantitative (measured scale) variables and qualitative thematic variables generated from open-ended responses served as within-time predictors of these health-related outcomes. A weaker belief that life is better in big cities was associated with stronger self-care beliefs during pregnancy. Also, a weaker belief that small towns offer tranquil environments was associated with total abstinence from alcohol. Regarding the Hispanic Paradox, these results suggest that a critical appreciation of cultural traditions can be protective, as this avoids stereotypical or idyllic views of urban or rural lifeways, and promotes self-protective beliefs and behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-284
Number of pages16
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

pregnancy
alcohol
Alcohols
small town
Alcohol Abstinence
young adult
Mexico
Self Care
health
community
Pregnancy
Hispanic Americans
Young Adult
Health
time

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • family traditions
  • Hispanic paradox
  • mixed methods
  • rural lifestyle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Traditions and Alcohol Use : A Mixed-Methods Analysis. / Castro, Felipe González; Coe, Kathryn.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 13, No. 4, 10.2007, p. 269-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castro, Felipe González ; Coe, Kathryn. / Traditions and Alcohol Use : A Mixed-Methods Analysis. In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 269-284.
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