Transcriptome profiling reveals matrisome alteration as a key feature of ovarian cancer progression

Sumegha Mitra, Kartikeya Tiwari, Ram Podicheti, Taruni Pandhiri, Douglas B. Rusch, Andrea Bonetto, Chi Zhang, Anirban K. Mitra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. There is a lack of comprehensive investigation of disease initiation and progression, including gene expression changes during early metastatic colonization. Methods: RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was done with matched primary tumors and fallopian tubes (n = 8 pairs) as well as matched metastatic and primary tumors (n = 11 pairs) from ovarian cancer patients. Since these are end point analyses, it was combined with RNA-seq using high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells seeded on an organotypic three-dimensional (3D) culture model of the omentum, mimicking early metastasis. This comprehensive approach revealed key changes in gene expression occurring in ovarian cancer initiation and metastasis, including early metastatic colonization. Results: 2987 genes were significantly deregulated in primary tumors compared to fallopian tubes, 845 genes were differentially expressed in metastasis compared to primary tumors and 304 genes were common to both. An assessment of patient metastasis and 3D omental culture model of early metastatic colonization revealed 144 common genes that were altered during early colonization and remain deregulated even in the fully developed metastasis. Deregulation of the matrisome was a key process in early and late metastasis. Conclusion: These findings will help in understanding the key pathways involved in ovarian cancer progression and eventually targeting those pathways for therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1513
JournalCancers
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2019

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Gene Expression Profiling
Ovarian Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Fallopian Tubes
Neoplasms
Genes
RNA
RNA Sequence Analysis
Gene Expression
Omentum
Disease Progression

Keywords

  • Fallopian tube
  • Gene expression
  • Matrisome
  • Metastasis
  • Ovarian cancer
  • Primary tumor
  • Sequencing
  • Tumor microenvironment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Transcriptome profiling reveals matrisome alteration as a key feature of ovarian cancer progression. / Mitra, Sumegha; Tiwari, Kartikeya; Podicheti, Ram; Pandhiri, Taruni; Rusch, Douglas B.; Bonetto, Andrea; Zhang, Chi; Mitra, Anirban K.

In: Cancers, Vol. 11, No. 10, 1513, 10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitra, Sumegha ; Tiwari, Kartikeya ; Podicheti, Ram ; Pandhiri, Taruni ; Rusch, Douglas B. ; Bonetto, Andrea ; Zhang, Chi ; Mitra, Anirban K. / Transcriptome profiling reveals matrisome alteration as a key feature of ovarian cancer progression. In: Cancers. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 10.
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