Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair

Thomas Doetschman, Joey V. Barnett, Raymond B. Runyan, Todd D. Camenisch, Ronald L. Heimark, Henk L. Granzier, Simon Conway, Mohamad Azhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of children with congenital heart disease now live into adulthood due to the remarkable surgical and medical advances that have taken place over the past half century. Because of this, adults now represent the largest age group with adult cardiovascular diseases. It includes patients with heart diseases that were not detected or not treated during childhood, those whose defects were surgically corrected but now need revision due to maladaptive responses to the procedure, those with exercise problems and those with age-related degenerative diseases. Because adult cardiovascular diseases in this population are relatively new, they are not well understood. It is therefore necessary to understand the molecular and physiological pathways involved if we are to improve treatments. Since there is a developmental basis to adult cardiovascular disease, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling pathways that are essential for proper cardiovascular development may also play critical roles in the homeostatic, repair and stress response processes involved in adult cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, we have chosen to summarize the current information on a subset of TGFβ ligand and receptor genes and related effector genes that, when dysregulated, are known to lead to cardiovascular diseases and adult cardiovascular deficiencies and/or pathologies. A better understanding of the TGFβ signaling network in cardiovascular disease and repair will impact genetic and physiologic investigations of cardiovascular diseases in elderly patients and lead to an improvement in clinical interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-223
Number of pages21
JournalCell and Tissue Research
Volume347
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Transforming Growth Factor beta
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Diseases
Transforming Growth Factor beta Receptors
Genes
Age Groups
Exercise
Pathology
Ligands
Population

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cardiovascular
  • Disease
  • Heart
  • TGFbeta

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Histology

Cite this

Doetschman, T., Barnett, J. V., Runyan, R. B., Camenisch, T. D., Heimark, R. L., Granzier, H. L., ... Azhar, M. (2012). Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair. Cell and Tissue Research, 347(1), 203-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00441-011-1241-3

Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair. / Doetschman, Thomas; Barnett, Joey V.; Runyan, Raymond B.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Granzier, Henk L.; Conway, Simon; Azhar, Mohamad.

In: Cell and Tissue Research, Vol. 347, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 203-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doetschman, T, Barnett, JV, Runyan, RB, Camenisch, TD, Heimark, RL, Granzier, HL, Conway, S & Azhar, M 2012, 'Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair', Cell and Tissue Research, vol. 347, no. 1, pp. 203-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00441-011-1241-3
Doetschman T, Barnett JV, Runyan RB, Camenisch TD, Heimark RL, Granzier HL et al. Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair. Cell and Tissue Research. 2012 Jan;347(1):203-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00441-011-1241-3
Doetschman, Thomas ; Barnett, Joey V. ; Runyan, Raymond B. ; Camenisch, Todd D. ; Heimark, Ronald L. ; Granzier, Henk L. ; Conway, Simon ; Azhar, Mohamad. / Transforming growth factor beta signaling in adult cardiovascular diseases and repair. In: Cell and Tissue Research. 2012 ; Vol. 347, No. 1. pp. 203-223.
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