Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease

Stacey L. Dineen, Zachary P. Neeb, Alexander Obukhov, Michael Sturek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is greatly exacerbated by underlying metabolic syndrome, which is defi ned as the presence of three or more of the following cardiovascular risk factors: obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Alterations in the endothelial lining of the vascular wall and smooth muscle phenotype are key components in the underlying pathology. Both endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle cell phenotype switching are mediated, at least in part, by altered intracellular Ca 2+ handling. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implicated in CAD progression, both in endothelial dysfunction and smooth muscle phenotypic changes. Despite the widespread distribution of TRP channels in numerous cell types and the involvement in many diseases, there is a relative paucity of data on the role of TRP channels in CAD. TRP canonical (TRPC) channels are located on coronary smooth muscle (CSM) cell membranes and are involved in mediating Ca 2+ entry. Increases in CSM TRPC expression and function are associated with CAD progression. In contrast, TRP vanilloid (TRPV) receptors are located primarily on the coronary endothelium, and function in normal physiology to increase intracellular Ca 2+ in response to ligands or sheer stress, leading to endothelial-dependent vasodilation. Decreases in endothelial TRPV receptors function and expression are associated with progression of CAD. The loss of proper balance between CSM TRPC and endothelial TRPV contributes, at least in part, to CAD progression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages381-396
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9783319296357
ISBN (Print)9783319296333
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Coronary Artery Disease
Muscle
Smooth Muscle
Disease Progression
TRPV Cation Channels
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Phenotype
Glucose Intolerance
Dyslipidemias
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Vasodilation
Endothelium
Insulin Resistance
Cause of Death
Physiology
Pathology
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cell membranes
Obesity

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Calcium
  • Dyslipidemia
  • Sarcoplasmic reticulum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Dineen, S. L., Neeb, Z. P., Obukhov, A., & Sturek, M. (2016). Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease. In Vascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease (pp. 381-396). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29635-7_17

Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease. / Dineen, Stacey L.; Neeb, Zachary P.; Obukhov, Alexander; Sturek, Michael.

Vascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 381-396.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Dineen, SL, Neeb, ZP, Obukhov, A & Sturek, M 2016, Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease. in Vascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease. Springer International Publishing, pp. 381-396. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29635-7_17
Dineen SL, Neeb ZP, Obukhov A, Sturek M. Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease. In Vascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 381-396 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29635-7_17
Dineen, Stacey L. ; Neeb, Zachary P. ; Obukhov, Alexander ; Sturek, Michael. / Transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome-induced coronary artery disease. Vascular Ion Channels in Physiology and Disease. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 381-396
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