Treatment of Bladder Diverticula, Impaired Detrusor Contractility, and Low Bladder Compliance

Charles Powell, Karl J. Kreder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bladder diverticula are common enough to be encountered by most urologists in practice but are reported less frequently in the literature than they were 50 years ago. Some patients can be managed nonoperatively, whereas others will need surgical intervention consisting of bladder outlet reduction and possibly removal of the diverticulum itself. In addition to the decision to operate, the timing of each intervention deserves careful consideration. Cystoscopy, computed tomography with contrast, urodynamic studies, cytology, and voiding cystourethrography play important roles in informing the clinician. Many new techniques for treatment of the bladder outlet and the diverticulum are available, such as laparoscopy and robotic surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-525
Number of pages15
JournalUrologic Clinics of North America
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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Compliance
Urinary Bladder
Cystoscopy
Urodynamics
Diverticulum
Robotics
Laparoscopy
Cell Biology
Tomography
Therapeutics
Bladder Diverticulum
Urologists

Keywords

  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia
  • Bladder neoplasms
  • Diverticulum
  • Urinary bladder
  • Urinary bladder neck obstruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Treatment of Bladder Diverticula, Impaired Detrusor Contractility, and Low Bladder Compliance. / Powell, Charles; Kreder, Karl J.

In: Urologic Clinics of North America, Vol. 36, No. 4, 11.2009, p. 511-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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