Trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality.

N. Miller, E. J. Simoes, J. C. Chang, Alexander Robling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the mortality trends for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among whites and African Americans in Missouri from 1980-1996. Data from the Missouri Center for Health Information Management and Epidemiology were used to calculate mortality rates. Missouri's COPD deaths rose 40.6% from 1980-1996. Projections through the year 2006 predict continued escalation in rates. Much of the growth in COPD can be attributed to heavy tobacco use in the population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-90
Number of pages4
JournalMissouri Medicine
Volume97
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Mortality
Health Information Management
Tobacco Use
African Americans
Epidemiology
Growth
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Miller, N., Simoes, E. J., Chang, J. C., & Robling, A. (2000). Trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality. Missouri Medicine, 97(3), 87-90.

Trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality. / Miller, N.; Simoes, E. J.; Chang, J. C.; Robling, Alexander.

In: Missouri Medicine, Vol. 97, No. 3, 03.2000, p. 87-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, N, Simoes, EJ, Chang, JC & Robling, A 2000, 'Trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality.', Missouri Medicine, vol. 97, no. 3, pp. 87-90.
Miller, N. ; Simoes, E. J. ; Chang, J. C. ; Robling, Alexander. / Trends in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality. In: Missouri Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 97, No. 3. pp. 87-90.
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