Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Nonfatal Violence-Related Injuries Among Adolescents in the United States, 2009-2013

Teresa M. Bell, Nan Qiao, Peter C. Jenkins, Charles B. Siedlecki, Alison M. Fecher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Violence-related injuries are a major cause of death and disability among adolescents in the United States. The objective of this study was to examine trends in adolescent violence-related injuries between 2009 and 2013. Methods: This study examined data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program for years 2009-2013. Linear regression was used to assess trends in rates of violence-related injuries among adolescents aged between 10 and 19 years. Results: We found overall rates of nonfatal violence-related injuries among all adolescents did not change significantly across the study years (p = .502). However, self-harm injury rates have significantly increased among female and younger adolescents during the period (p = .001 and .011, respectively). Conclusions: Our results indicate that the overall intentional injury rates in adolescents have been stable; however, rates of self-injury have significantly increased in younger adolescents and females. Future research should focus on exploring causes of increases in self-harm injuries in these subpopulations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 14 2015

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Violence
Hospital Emergency Service
Wounds and Injuries
Cause of Death
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Injury epidemiology
  • Injury prevention
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Nonfatal Violence-Related Injuries Among Adolescents in the United States, 2009-2013. / Bell, Teresa M.; Qiao, Nan; Jenkins, Peter C.; Siedlecki, Charles B.; Fecher, Alison M.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 14.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, Teresa M. ; Qiao, Nan ; Jenkins, Peter C. ; Siedlecki, Charles B. ; Fecher, Alison M. / Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Nonfatal Violence-Related Injuries Among Adolescents in the United States, 2009-2013. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2015.
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