Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Darpan Bansal, Venkat Gaddam, Y. Wady Aude, Joe Bissett, Ibrahim Fahdi, Luis Garza, Jacob Joseph, Behzad Molavi, B. V. Pai, Anjan Sinha, Eugene S. Smith, J. L. Mehta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acute cardiac care of the veterans at Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals has been thought of as poor in quality. We examined the use of life-saving, evidence-based medical therapy in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences-affiliated VA Medical Center in Little Rock and compared the use of this therapy with other hospitals in Arkansas and in the rest of the nation. Methods: Use of life-saving medical therapy in 117 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction from January 2002 to December 2002 was compared with the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction database for the identical period. Results: Heparin/low-molecular-weight heparin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors were used in 88% and 66% of patients, respectively. Aspirin, β adrenergic-blocking agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) were used in 92%, 93%, 62%, and 79% of the patients, respectively. The use of these therapies was better than in similar patients in Arkansas (P <.001) and the United States as a whole (P <.01). Calcium-channel blockers were used in 16% of the patients. At a mean follow-up period of 1.5 years, use of β blockers and aspirin had decreased, whereas the use of statins and ACE inhibitors/ARBs was unchanged. Conclusion: This study shows that patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to this university-affiliated VA Medical Center receive evidence-based life-saving medical therapy more often than in the rest Arkansas or in the entire United States. More important, patients at this federal institution continue to receive life-saving medical therapy during follow-up. Better use of evidence-based therapy may be related to affiliation of this VA Medical Center with a teaching institution where board certified cardiologists are involved in short- and long-term care of these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Veterans
Patient Care
Myocardial Infarction
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Therapeutics
Aspirin
Veterans Hospitals
Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
Adrenergic Antagonists
Low Molecular Weight Heparin
Calcium Channel Blockers
Long-Term Care
Registries
Heparin
Teaching
Oxidoreductases
Databases

Keywords

  • Evidence-based therapy
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center. / Bansal, Darpan; Gaddam, Venkat; Aude, Y. Wady; Bissett, Joe; Fahdi, Ibrahim; Garza, Luis; Joseph, Jacob; Molavi, Behzad; Pai, B. V.; Sinha, Anjan; Smith, Eugene S.; Mehta, J. L.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 10, No. 1, 03.2005, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bansal, D, Gaddam, V, Aude, YW, Bissett, J, Fahdi, I, Garza, L, Joseph, J, Molavi, B, Pai, BV, Sinha, A, Smith, ES & Mehta, JL 2005, 'Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center', Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1177/107424840501000105
Bansal, Darpan ; Gaddam, Venkat ; Aude, Y. Wady ; Bissett, Joe ; Fahdi, Ibrahim ; Garza, Luis ; Joseph, Jacob ; Molavi, Behzad ; Pai, B. V. ; Sinha, Anjan ; Smith, Eugene S. ; Mehta, J. L. / Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 2005 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 39-44.
@article{99add1e2a3bb48958863a60882beb8aa,
title = "Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center",
abstract = "Background: Acute cardiac care of the veterans at Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals has been thought of as poor in quality. We examined the use of life-saving, evidence-based medical therapy in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences-affiliated VA Medical Center in Little Rock and compared the use of this therapy with other hospitals in Arkansas and in the rest of the nation. Methods: Use of life-saving medical therapy in 117 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction from January 2002 to December 2002 was compared with the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction database for the identical period. Results: Heparin/low-molecular-weight heparin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors were used in 88{\%} and 66{\%} of patients, respectively. Aspirin, β adrenergic-blocking agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) were used in 92{\%}, 93{\%}, 62{\%}, and 79{\%} of the patients, respectively. The use of these therapies was better than in similar patients in Arkansas (P <.001) and the United States as a whole (P <.01). Calcium-channel blockers were used in 16{\%} of the patients. At a mean follow-up period of 1.5 years, use of β blockers and aspirin had decreased, whereas the use of statins and ACE inhibitors/ARBs was unchanged. Conclusion: This study shows that patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to this university-affiliated VA Medical Center receive evidence-based life-saving medical therapy more often than in the rest Arkansas or in the entire United States. More important, patients at this federal institution continue to receive life-saving medical therapy during follow-up. Better use of evidence-based therapy may be related to affiliation of this VA Medical Center with a teaching institution where board certified cardiologists are involved in short- and long-term care of these patients.",
keywords = "Evidence-based therapy, Myocardial infarction, Veterans Affairs Healthcare System",
author = "Darpan Bansal and Venkat Gaddam and Aude, {Y. Wady} and Joe Bissett and Ibrahim Fahdi and Luis Garza and Jacob Joseph and Behzad Molavi and Pai, {B. V.} and Anjan Sinha and Smith, {Eugene S.} and Mehta, {J. L.}",
year = "2005",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1177/107424840501000105",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "39--44",
journal = "Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics",
issn = "1074-2484",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trends in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction at a university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center

AU - Bansal, Darpan

AU - Gaddam, Venkat

AU - Aude, Y. Wady

AU - Bissett, Joe

AU - Fahdi, Ibrahim

AU - Garza, Luis

AU - Joseph, Jacob

AU - Molavi, Behzad

AU - Pai, B. V.

AU - Sinha, Anjan

AU - Smith, Eugene S.

AU - Mehta, J. L.

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - Background: Acute cardiac care of the veterans at Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals has been thought of as poor in quality. We examined the use of life-saving, evidence-based medical therapy in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences-affiliated VA Medical Center in Little Rock and compared the use of this therapy with other hospitals in Arkansas and in the rest of the nation. Methods: Use of life-saving medical therapy in 117 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction from January 2002 to December 2002 was compared with the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction database for the identical period. Results: Heparin/low-molecular-weight heparin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors were used in 88% and 66% of patients, respectively. Aspirin, β adrenergic-blocking agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) were used in 92%, 93%, 62%, and 79% of the patients, respectively. The use of these therapies was better than in similar patients in Arkansas (P <.001) and the United States as a whole (P <.01). Calcium-channel blockers were used in 16% of the patients. At a mean follow-up period of 1.5 years, use of β blockers and aspirin had decreased, whereas the use of statins and ACE inhibitors/ARBs was unchanged. Conclusion: This study shows that patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to this university-affiliated VA Medical Center receive evidence-based life-saving medical therapy more often than in the rest Arkansas or in the entire United States. More important, patients at this federal institution continue to receive life-saving medical therapy during follow-up. Better use of evidence-based therapy may be related to affiliation of this VA Medical Center with a teaching institution where board certified cardiologists are involved in short- and long-term care of these patients.

AB - Background: Acute cardiac care of the veterans at Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals has been thought of as poor in quality. We examined the use of life-saving, evidence-based medical therapy in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences-affiliated VA Medical Center in Little Rock and compared the use of this therapy with other hospitals in Arkansas and in the rest of the nation. Methods: Use of life-saving medical therapy in 117 patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction from January 2002 to December 2002 was compared with the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction database for the identical period. Results: Heparin/low-molecular-weight heparin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors were used in 88% and 66% of patients, respectively. Aspirin, β adrenergic-blocking agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) were used in 92%, 93%, 62%, and 79% of the patients, respectively. The use of these therapies was better than in similar patients in Arkansas (P <.001) and the United States as a whole (P <.01). Calcium-channel blockers were used in 16% of the patients. At a mean follow-up period of 1.5 years, use of β blockers and aspirin had decreased, whereas the use of statins and ACE inhibitors/ARBs was unchanged. Conclusion: This study shows that patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to this university-affiliated VA Medical Center receive evidence-based life-saving medical therapy more often than in the rest Arkansas or in the entire United States. More important, patients at this federal institution continue to receive life-saving medical therapy during follow-up. Better use of evidence-based therapy may be related to affiliation of this VA Medical Center with a teaching institution where board certified cardiologists are involved in short- and long-term care of these patients.

KW - Evidence-based therapy

KW - Myocardial infarction

KW - Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20144388678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20144388678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/107424840501000105

DO - 10.1177/107424840501000105

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 39

EP - 44

JO - Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics

JF - Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics

SN - 1074-2484

IS - 1

ER -