Tumor-associated aphasia in left hemisphere primary brain tumors

The importance of age and tumor grade

L. D. Recht, K. McCarthy, Brian O'Donnell, R. Cohen, D. A. Drachman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although one-quarter of patients with primary brain tumors have language disturbances at the time of initial presentation, the factors contributing to their aphasia are not clear. A group of 32 patienta with primary tumors of the left hemisphere was collected retrospectively and the relationship between clinical, radiographic, and pathologic factors and tumor-associated aphasia was examined. We assessed language function before beginning any treatment including steroids. The factor that best predicted language disturbance was greater patient age; the only other significant factor was tumor grade. Tumor size made a nearly significant impact, but tumor location within the left hemisphere did not correlate with aphasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-50
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume39
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aphasia
Brain Neoplasms
Language
Neoplasms
Steroids
Left Hemisphere
Brain Tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tumor-associated aphasia in left hemisphere primary brain tumors : The importance of age and tumor grade. / Recht, L. D.; McCarthy, K.; O'Donnell, Brian; Cohen, R.; Drachman, D. A.

In: Neurology, Vol. 39, No. 1, 1989, p. 48-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Recht, LD, McCarthy, K, O'Donnell, B, Cohen, R & Drachman, DA 1989, 'Tumor-associated aphasia in left hemisphere primary brain tumors: The importance of age and tumor grade', Neurology, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 48-50.
Recht, L. D. ; McCarthy, K. ; O'Donnell, Brian ; Cohen, R. ; Drachman, D. A. / Tumor-associated aphasia in left hemisphere primary brain tumors : The importance of age and tumor grade. In: Neurology. 1989 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 48-50.
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